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Jonathan McDowell
Corrected orbital data for the Roadster: 0.99 x 1.71 AU x 1.1 deg C3 = 12.0, passes orbit of Mars Jul 2018, aphelion November
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Robert Fritzinger Feb 7
Replying to @planet4589
Really not even close to the asteroid belt. It will make it just past Mars orbit.....right??
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Jonathan McDowell Feb 7
Replying to @RAFritz7
Correct
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Ben Pearson Feb 7
Replying to @planet4589
So these numbers are assuming that the C3=12 was correct? Either the C3 is correct, or the distance from the sun is correct, but not both?
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Scott Sutherland (🌦️🌩️🌀🌙🚀🛰️) Feb 7
Replying to @planet4589
So, it's more like this corrected plot?
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Jonathan McDowell Feb 7
Replying to @kd7uiy
We now know that the C3=12 was correct and the 'aphelion in the belt at 2.6 AU' was a mistake.
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Jonathan McDowell Feb 7
Replying to @ScottWx_TWN
More or less
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Jim B Feb 7
Replying to @planet4589
Was the Earth at the perihelion of the orbit at the time the Roadster left the Earth's orbit? Would the Earth's heliocentric longitude give us a line of apsides?
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Jonathan McDowell Feb 7
Replying to @httprover
Yes. I have (approximately) i = 1.10, node = 316.78, AOP = 179.33; M = 3.82 at Feb 11 1800 UTC
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Sebastián Arboleda Feb 7
Good lord, that's a massive delta-V. Doesn't the minimum energy orbit take about 2 years?
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Jonathan McDowell Feb 7
That's to pass Mars slowly . You can get there much quicker if you don't mind whizzing past at high speed, with the same initial energy as if you were doing the slow route
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Sebastián Arboleda Feb 7
Do you know if the plan is to retrofire to leave Starman in Mars orbit?
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Jonathan McDowell Feb 7
It's not going anywhere near Mars. And it's dead now, no ability to manuever
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Gerrit Immink Feb 7
Do you have any idea of how close roadster will get to mars on this first orbit/when?
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Jonathan McDowell Feb 7
About 100 million km, not close at all
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I am Feb 8
Replying to @planet4589 @jeff_foust
Am Inright in saying there is no equipment on the Roadster that’s will send us any type of data back and it’s so small, our telescopes or radar etc can’t track it? It’s just theoretical information now, right? Will Mars orbiter be able to see or detect it when it passes by Mars?
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Dhruva Malekar Feb 8
Replying to @planet4589
I want to understand the calculation a lot better ...where should I start....as in what is C3?? And what formula is used etc..
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Joseph Shuster Sr Feb 8
"...crosses the orbits of Earth..." According to what I've seen it intersects Earth's orbit. To cross (inside) Earth's orbit, they'd need to slow down a bit (most efficiently at aphelion).
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Dave Faubert Feb 8
You know a lot, so I have a question: Musk advertised the car as being on a Mars-orbit trajectory. After the final burn. he bragged that it was going past that. Isn't this cause for concern? If Cassini went past Saturn no one would be bragging.
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Jonathan McDowell Feb 8
He was speaking loosely, it was never targeted precisely for Mars. And the going past that brag turned out to be a mistake, it is in fact going just a smidge past Mars orbit
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