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Jonathan McDowell
Corrected orbital data for the Roadster: 0.99 x 1.71 AU x 1.1 deg C3 = 12.0, passes orbit of Mars Jul 2018, aphelion November
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Jonathan McDowell 7 Feb 18
That's to pass Mars slowly . You can get there much quicker if you don't mind whizzing past at high speed, with the same initial energy as if you were doing the slow route
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Jonathan McDowell 7 Feb 18
It's not going anywhere near Mars. And it's dead now, no ability to manuever
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Bob Fritz 7 Feb 18
Replying to @planet4589
Really not even close to the asteroid belt. It will make it just past Mars orbit.....right??
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Jonathan McDowell 7 Feb 18
Replying to @RAFritz7
Correct
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Ben Pearson 7 Feb 18
Replying to @planet4589
So these numbers are assuming that the C3=12 was correct? Either the C3 is correct, or the distance from the sun is correct, but not both?
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Jonathan McDowell 7 Feb 18
Replying to @kd7uiy
We now know that the C3=12 was correct and the 'aphelion in the belt at 2.6 AU' was a mistake.
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Dave Faubert 8 Feb 18
You know a lot, so I have a question: Musk advertised the car as being on a Mars-orbit trajectory. After the final burn. he bragged that it was going past that. Isn't this cause for concern? If Cassini went past Saturn no one would be bragging.
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Jonathan McDowell 8 Feb 18
He was speaking loosely, it was never targeted precisely for Mars. And the going past that brag turned out to be a mistake, it is in fact going just a smidge past Mars orbit
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Dhruva Malekar 8 Feb 18
Replying to @planet4589
I want to understand the calculation a lot better ...where should I start....as in what is C3?? And what formula is used etc..
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Jonathan McDowell 8 Feb 18
Replying to @DhruvaMalekar
search on 'astrodynamics'. We split the problem up into Kepler's-laws-like problems in the near-Earth and far-from-Earth cases. Near Earth it's a hyperbola, and C3 is velocity-squared it would have at infinity if the rest of the universe didn't exist
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