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Eric Bland May 28
You can see the extrusion marks here. I have read up on the process. It is not recommended for critical components. Grain runs lateral. Defects can easily occur. Start/end of extruded section often substandard
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phoennix10 May 28
Looking at the original defective part, That part never saw an extrusion die. It was a pure casting. You do not get defects like that if it was put through extrusion dies. Even shitty Chinese Al extruders in TaiYuan can’t form defects like that.
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ben k May 29
Holy shit. So that’s it. They are actually cast. I’m guessing the machining marks on the sides of the CAs are from some type of finishing process to make them look presentable. This is unbelievable. You ever heard of anyone using CAST suspension parts?
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Eric Bland May 29
I am not an expert in metallurgy or in metal casting or extrusion bit I do have training and experience in metal machining and in material testing. I still think that on the available evidence it is sliced extrusion rather than casting. Either way it is bad engineering.
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ben k May 29
Me neither, but I'm very inclined to agree with since it seems like he is an expert, and you just don't get that kind of porosity with extrusion. I'm still willing to buy one of these and send it out to someone for analysis.
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Eric Bland May 29
Plenty available on Ebay but the Eloonites will claim it might have already been damaged in a crash and your findings are invalid. It would be good to have it analysed for metallurgy and fatigue cracking and then tested for tensile strength.
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ben k May 29
Yeah, I'd be ordering a brand new one. Just need someone with the connections to do the testing.
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Eric Bland May 29
Edmunds?
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ben k May 29
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Eric Bland May 29
Replying to @Benshooter @phoennix10
WOW!
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phoennix10
thanks for finding this. Proves my point that this was casted. Terrible quality control. As an ex F and DCX auto engineer, I would’ve never casted a suspension part. All these parts should be recalled.
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ben k May 29
Replying to @phoennix10
Especially on a car that weighs damn near 5,000 pounds.
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Eric Bland May 29
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Eric Bland May 29
Dude.... please file a complaint with NHTSA...perhaps? they might listen to you???
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warrior cop May 29
u up
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Prof John Frink May 29
Question: Is this use of cast aluminum parts outside of industry standards or merely inadvisable? On the link provided it seems parts of the Grand Cherokee's suspension are made the same way. Sorry if it's a dumb question, I don't know anything about this stuff.
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Investor Gator 🇺🇸 May 29
So this part should be extruded instead of casted? What about comparable cars (by weight)?
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Eric Bland May 29
Does THIS look good enough??? OMG!!
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ben k May 29
IDK enough to speak to those specifics. I primarily work on German vehicles, and they use forged AL or steel almost exclusively. The full report from that sample is $1750. I didn't feel like paying that. But stacking yourself against a Jeep product certainly isn't advisable
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