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Patricia Fripp
TEDx Speaker, Official Expert, Executive Speech Coach, Keynote , , ,
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Patricia Fripp 9h
Eye contact gives you an edge in business. It’s a proven factor in the persuasion process. It demonstrates confidence and increases likability.
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Patricia Fripp 12h
Why Is Eye Contact Important? How Long? When? Eye contact is essential to creating an emotional connection with an audience of any size. This is true whether you’re speaking one-on-one or delivering a formal presentation from the stage.
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Patricia Fripp 15h
Frippercize Consider your habits. Ask yourself: - Which of my current habits help me? - Which habits don’t help me? - What new habits do I want to acquire? - Which habits will I get rid of?
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Patricia Fripp 18h
Good habits can determine the success of our public speaking & careers. Habits are a part of us, built up like the layers of a pearl from our own juices. They can either provide a lustrous shield against adversity – or an imprisoning shell of our own making.
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Patricia Fripp 19h
I asked to share his thoughts on what it takes to be a hero. He said that heroes aspire to embody three qualities: -The clarity to see what is required of them. -The courage to accept what is required of them. -The capacity to discharge what is required of them.
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Patricia Fripp Jun 30
If you want to improve, you need to develop a positive, flexible, and creative attitude toward feedback.
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Patricia Fripp Jun 30
Why do some smart people not realize the success they deserve? How to Succeed in Business and Sales in the Virtual World: Web Training: Wednesday, July 22 at 10 am PT
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Patricia Fripp Jun 30
“Patricia Fripp is the perfect mix of sales trainer and speech coach. She has an uncanny knack to quickly get to the core of an engineer’s roadblock and help them break free to more effective communications.” – Tia Finn, Senior HR Strategic Business Partner
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Patricia Fripp Jun 30
Your message is not simply conveyed by your words, but also by the spaces between them. A pause allows your listeners to stay engaged and makes it possible for them to follow what comes next.
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Patricia Fripp Jun 30
No one enjoys being criticized! Yet, if you want to succeed, you’ve got to overcome all your natural instincts and actively seek out feedback, good and bad.
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Patricia Fripp Jun 30
Are you speaking too quickly? It can happen unconsciously. Sometimes public speaking can trigger an adrenaline rush. You might feel charged with energy or a bit nervous. If you’re speaking too quickly, you jeopardize the overall success of your message.
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Patricia Fripp Jun 29
If you open the floor to a Q&A, first let people know exactly how long they have. It’s also a good idea to have some questions in your back pocket.
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Patricia Fripp Jun 29
Remember that your last words linger. Never introduce a new idea at the end of your presentation. Use your last words to reinforce a key, pithy point from your presentation.
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Patricia Fripp Jun 29
Grab your audience’s attention in your first 30 seconds. I suggest you say, “Welcome to (name of your session).” Then say, “In case we haven’t had the pleasure of meeting, I am . . .” Give your name, and then say, “In my role as a . . .”
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Patricia Fripp Jun 29
When you’re an engineer presenting at a user meeting or customer conference, you are the expert on the topic you plan to deliver to your customers. Remember, your audience does not want to know everything you know; they just need to know about the subject of your presentation.
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Patricia Fripp Jun 29
There’s a cliché that engineers can’t speak effectively. Patricia Fripp has debunked this myth. As presenters, engineers have both the expertise and authenticity to build customer trust and accelerate the adoption of new technology.
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Patricia Fripp Jun 27
The majority of stories I use in my presentations are about what happens around me, what I observe, what I learn.
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Patricia Fripp Jun 27
An unforgettable presentation is “sticky.” It sticks with audience members and continues to influence long after the presentation is over. Vivid and authentic stories are central to presentations that “stick.”
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Patricia Fripp Jun 27
Here’s how to condense your speech without losing impact: 1. Don’t apologize or mention that you have more time 2. Begin quickly. 3. Use a strongly visual story. 4. Divide your five minutes into three parts. Example, you might present a problem, your solution, and the payoff.
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Patricia Fripp Jun 27
Thoughtful choices in word order, give you the opportunity to highlight your most significant information and deliver this as “impact phrases.”
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