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Peter Frankopan
Wall painting from the Qusayr ‘Amra palace - built in the 8th C by future Caliph Walid II. Figurative art was not problematic for the first generations of Muslims.
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Katherine Schofield 25 Nov 17
Replying to @peterfrankopan
It's BEAUTIFUL! Incidentally, Shahab Ahmed argues that figurative art was mainstream in Islam before colonialism; worth reading to confound our assumptions.
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Peter Frankopan 25 Nov 17
Replying to @katherineschof8
One of the many ironies of ....
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Marius Hollenga 25 Nov 17
Replying to @peterfrankopan
God that's pretty.
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Ian Lawley 25 Nov 17
Replying to @peterfrankopan
Beautiful. There’s a long tradition of figurative Islamic Art, particularly evident in Persian and Ottoman miniatures and ceramics.
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Geoffrey Tobin 26 Nov 17
Strangest of all: the Quran explicitly forbids bigamy, and yet we find ...
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Ghurabalbayn 🇪🇺 25 Nov 17
Replying to @peterfrankopan
But caliph Abd al-Malik created the first coins without a ruler’s portrait on them in 696. Apparently for some purposes figurative art was not recommendable.
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Geoffrey Tobin 26 Nov 17
They weren’t the first such coins. My Breton ancestors were minting such coins centuries earlier.
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Geoffrey Tobin 26 Nov 17
Never trust a “Hadith”.
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Geoffrey Tobin 26 Nov 17
Muslims outside their natural habitat are Dimmi, after all.
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