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DMa
Dedicated normie
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DMa 6h
Replying to @tenderlove
Cool! I just started trying to learn Norman myself:
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DMa 6h
Replying to @tenderlove
What keyboard layout do you actually use?
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DMa Sep 17
Replying to @marcoarment
Great update! I'm particularly happy about search on the main screen
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DMa Sep 16
Replying to @nicereiss @mrsma1990
It’s my favorite show
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DMa Sep 15
Chicken fingers:
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DMa retweeted
Reductress Sep 14
Friend Who Texted ‘I’m Just Seeing This Now!’ Awarded Pulitzer Prize In Fiction:
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DMa Sep 11
Replying to @LauraTrev
Mine is bringing all the hoodies out of my home office 😆
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DMa Sep 6
Replying to @815C
That's definitely a good point. Sharing an understanding of why we show up is super important.
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DMa Sep 6
Replying to @815C
I still think the use of "dialog" is slightly suspect, but I don't have much interest in arguing about it since it doesn't bother me personally like the more common dinner table analogy does 2/2
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DMa Sep 6
Replying to @815C
To your point, I haven't heard this version of the dinner table analogy (where his people are singular). So I'd agree that most of the things I said don't really apply to your intent in the analogy. I think _your_ version of the dinner table analogy is interesting 1/
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DMa Sep 6
Replying to @brian_weaver
this is the content i crave
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DMa Sep 6
Replying to @815C
Addendum: the worst offender in the "this is a dinner table" space is staff meetings.
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DMa Sep 6
Replying to @815C
I think it feels like a lecture hall, where you come to observe, and maybe even participate a little bit with some raised hands and amens, but a far cry overall from the dinner table 8/8
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DMa Sep 6
Replying to @815C
If they don't, then they really can just watch/listen online and their experience isn't any different (because they didn't want a seat in the first place). But for the majority, I don't think the common American church service does make people feel like they have a seat 7/
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DMa Sep 6
Replying to @815C
I think almost everyone wants to be at the dinner table. Everyone wants to be in a place where it feels like it really matters if they are there. Not in a judge-y way, but in a way where you know the people around you care about you and your presence. 6/
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DMa Sep 6
Replying to @815C
In this, we implicitly recognize that a person only present for the service hasn't had their seat at the table. It's the elements surrounding the service where all truly have a seat. To speak, to be heard, and importantly, to listen to non-prepared statements 5/
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DMa Sep 6
Replying to @815C
Getting a little broader, I think we largely recognize that the sermon (and the service at large) aren't really anything like the dinner table when we say things about how we hope people don't just show up and leave immediately 4/
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DMa Sep 6
Replying to @815C
Every person at the dinner table has an affect on the conversation, even if they don't say anything! For example, we'll talk about different things if it's just my immediately family or if in-laws are at the table (even if the in-laws were to just listen) 3/
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DMa Sep 6
Replying to @815C
But the difference between a sermon and a dinner table is that the content of the dinner table discussion is directly affected by who is at the dinner table. There are a limited number of people in a church service who's presence (or lack thereof) can change the content. 2/
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DMa Sep 6
Replying to @815C
I'll only speak for "listening to a sermon" in it's specific case, because it turns into a much bigger conversation if you talk about the whole "going to a church building on a Sunday" experience. 1/
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