Twitter | Search | |
Patrick Collison
Where do you most often come across interesting ideas—especially weird or surprising ones?
Reply Retweet Like More
Ed Boyden Feb 24
Replying to @patrickc
1. By rebooting old failures. 2. By reading old science. 3. By trying to have all possible ideas.
Reply Retweet Like
Patrick Collison Feb 24
Replying to @eboyden3
How do you read old science? (Like, do you read papers or something else? How do you choose which things to read?)
Reply Retweet Like
Ed Boyden Feb 24
Replying to @patrickc
Reading papers from the 1960s and 1970s has launched many a heroic project in our lab. The choosing is a bit of an art form.
Reply Retweet Like
Patrick Collison Feb 24
Replying to @eboyden3
You should write about that art!
Reply Retweet Like
Keith Horwood Feb 24
Replying to @patrickc
By talking to, and more importantly listening to, weird and surprising people.
Reply Retweet Like
Patrick Collison Feb 24
Replying to @keithwhor
Who are the top 5 weird people?
Reply Retweet Like
Conrad Barski Feb 24
Replying to @patrickc
Any movie that has a high critic rating on rottentomatoes but an abysmal audience score usually has interesting ideas.
Reply Retweet Like
Patrick Collison Feb 24
Replying to @lisperati
That’s a good one.
Reply Retweet Like
Noah Smith Feb 24
Replying to @patrickc
Discussions with smart people who aren't very well-read!
Reply Retweet Like
Patrick Collison Feb 24
Replying to @Noahpinion
Does that suggest that we should all read less?
Reply Retweet Like
Kyle Russell 🚀 Feb 24
Replying to @patrickc
Books from authors whose perspectives have gone out of fashion
Reply Retweet Like
Patrick Collison Feb 24
Replying to @kylebrussell
Got any good examples?
Reply Retweet Like
Saku Panditharatne Feb 24
Replying to @patrickc
Reading old predictions about the future!
Reply Retweet Like
Noah Smith Feb 24
Replying to @patrickc
I'm not sure! Maybe it's just that we've been exposed to so many ideas that the only ones that still seem novel to us are the ones incubating in Galapagos-style isolation. Or maybe inundating ourselves with others' ideas really does inhibit us from thinking up our own.
Reply Retweet Like
Patrick Collison Feb 24
Replying to @sknthla
Any good examples come to mind?
Reply Retweet Like
Mark C. Webster Feb 24
Replying to @patrickc
A few years ago I actually starting putting together your idea for a monthly subscription to random trade/industry magazines. This thread is making me wish I’d launched it.
Reply Retweet Like
Patrick Collison Feb 24
Replying to @Noahpinion
Maybe this is why respondents to your poll were so worried about Facebook... a more connected world is less epistemically fertile ground?
Reply Retweet Like
Saku Panditharatne Feb 24
Replying to @patrickc
Any new technology, I look at archives about what was said about it. But it applies to inventions more broadly e.g. to what was said about common stock when it first became a thing
Reply Retweet Like
Noah Smith Feb 24
Replying to @patrickc
Seems possible! For example, I read that idea in a Neal Stephenson essay about 7 years back. :-)
Reply Retweet Like