Twitter | Search | |
Patrick McKenzie
I work for the Internet, at , mostly on Atlas. Opinions here are my own.
28,655
Tweets
544
Following
50,017
Followers
Tweets
Patrick McKenzie 30m
Replying to @justkelly_ok
人の経験はそれぞれですが15年以上日本に住み続けた外国人の立場から思ったら何となく予想できるのではないかと思います。
Reply Retweet Like
Patrick McKenzie 8h
Replying to @patio11
But the real reason to avoid doing this is that professionals are not needy people and therefore if you trigger someone’s “I am clearly talking to a needy person” heuristic you risk getting treated as a charity case rather than as a professional. (Reporting not endorsing.)
Reply Retweet Like
Patrick McKenzie 8h
Replying to @patio11
e.g. Want to pay for a parent’s retirement? Trivial on an AppAmaGooBookSoft salary at the bottom of their ranges, so given that they have just saved your parent, why (they ask themselves) would they need to sweeten the deal further?
Reply Retweet Like
Patrick McKenzie 8h
Strong endorse. Also, virtually regardless of your circumstances, the number you perceive as your need is low relative to achievable options in our industry, so you can end up capping yourself for no reason whatsoever.
Reply Retweet Like
Patrick McKenzie 9h
Replying to @ryanwaggoner
Since ~2006, but I started doing this in ~2006 and was getting material uptake on it by no later than 2008.
Reply Retweet Like
Patrick McKenzie 9h
Replying to @RyanSumo
This feels unlikely to me, based on how many people I talk to have at least one interesting to say when we have a conversation.
Reply Retweet Like
Patrick McKenzie 9h
Replying to @OminousWater
I have a page on my website about it and mention in my e.g. HN profile and sometimes on Twitter. (I don't really do social media outside of those two, especially not professionally.)
Reply Retweet Like
Patrick McKenzie 9h
Replying to @patio11
And so the policy which you instituted to protect your time ends up potentially both increasing the demands on your time and also decreasing your exposure to interesting conversations via gatekeeping yourself from them.
Reply Retweet Like
Patrick McKenzie 9h
Replying to @patio11
Like, if one is the hypothetical Silicon Valley VC whose filter is "Find someone I trust to intro you and then you get a conversation", forcing the work on the person wanting to talk to you and the voucher commits you to definitely making the conversation happen.
Reply Retweet Like
Patrick McKenzie 10h
Replying to @MarkLutter
(In my life prior to this I would get e.g. dinner invitations from friends and decline because I would be uncomfortable at dinner, and then dinner invitations stop coming, and so this was my "Ensure that relationships actually get maintained thing" which turned out really good.)
Reply Retweet Like
Patrick McKenzie 10h
Replying to @MarkLutter
I have moderate to severe social anxiety and a coping mechanism for it for me was adopting a commitment strategy, which is "I say yes to everything unless I can articulate a compelling reason to say no." My inbox management is a slight variant of the above.
Reply Retweet Like
Patrick McKenzie 10h
Replying to @patio11
I think one of the reasons why people don't do it is they want to be protective of their time, but if you signpost expectations about availability and decrease the cost of contacting you, that decreases the downside to both parties if the conversation can't happen immediately.
Reply Retweet Like
Patrick McKenzie 10h
Replying to @patio11
Conversation which happens all the time: "Where did you find [a candidate / a lead / an opportunity / etc]." "Oh they found me on the Internet." "Wow I wish that happened to me." "This is really and truly not a hard wish to operationalize on."
Reply Retweet Like
Patrick McKenzie 10h
This is my periodic reminder that a substantial portion of all value I've created in my career is downstream of making it very easy for people to contact me and explicitly soliciting it. It's so easy to execute on it's practically cheating.
Reply Retweet Like
Patrick McKenzie 14h
Replying to @ryanwaggoner
The family rule is that I speak only English in front of the kids; like most conversations in my house, this was a mixture of both.
Reply Retweet Like
Patrick McKenzie 23h
Me: “One second honey, want to message my team and then will do that thing.” Ruriko: “OK.” Lillian: “Dad’s on a team?!?” Me: “Yes!” Lillian: “Are you a $POSITION like $FRIEND’s dad?!?” Me: “In a very metaphorical way of speaking?” Lillian: “Aww man that’s a no.”
Reply Retweet Like
Patrick McKenzie 23h
Replying to @miclugo
The general thing I want folks to understand is that there is a list of relatively few people who can claim "Oh yeah my career's impact to middle class families is denominated in, let me do the math, tens of trillions? Give or take a trillion here or there? I lose count."
Reply Retweet Like
Patrick McKenzie 23h
Replying to @miclugo
I mean that toy model is simple but people's allocation isn't entirely US large cap equities, prices were different for e.g. actively managed bond funds, there's some dispute over whether 8% is a reasonable approximation for market returns, etc etc. Model is "wrong but useful."
Reply Retweet Like
Patrick McKenzie 24h
Replying to @patio11
The difference between 2% and 10bps is approximately a quarter of the returns to capitalism, which compounded over a 35 year working career work out to about 2X difference. (Being somewhat handwavy on the math in the interest of general legibility.)
Reply Retweet Like
Patrick McKenzie 24h
Replying to @patio11
The fee is the management fee for mutual funds, which were clustered in the ~2% region when they were principally actively managed by stock pickers who purported to deliver above-market performance. This promise was not true. Bogle popularized a better product costing 10 bps.
Reply Retweet Like