Twitter | Search | |
Patrick McKenzie
I work for the Internet, at , mostly on accelerating startups. Opinions here are my own.
32,171
Tweets
608
Following
61,665
Followers
Tweets
Patrick McKenzie Sep 13
Lillian, 4: “Video games sure would be easier if I could read.” Me: “That is a great reason to learn to read.” Ruriko: “No corrupting our kids.” Me: “Video games are a great reason to learn to program.” Ruriko: “... OK that works.”
Reply Retweet Like
Patrick McKenzie Sep 13
Replying to @KeMonte_Jones
Saw it, have been a bit swamped. Will try during the 3 day weekend but can’t make promises.
Reply Retweet Like
Patrick McKenzie Sep 13
Replying to @DanPierson
Hah, I think I can imagine a sequence of events. First name at
Reply Retweet Like
Patrick McKenzie Sep 13
Replying to @byrneseyeview
That is *by far* the most intellectual scat humor I’ve ever heard.
Reply Retweet Like
Patrick McKenzie Sep 12
Replying to @nbashaw
Even short taller things would work! I live in a 9 story building on the footprint of maybe 2 or 3 SF small single-family homes. It houses 60 families.
Reply Retweet Like
Patrick McKenzie Sep 12
Replying to @tylertringas
Add to that a whole host of functional requirements that they're starting to lose deals over and/or get told that they have to get done Immediately, like: "Hey, audits are a thing now. Can we pass? Shouldn't be hard, right." "We got BigCo security questionnaire. What to do?"
Reply Retweet Like
Patrick McKenzie Sep 12
Replying to @tylertringas
These include e.g. a defined engineering recruiting process, career ladders (and potentially contentious conversations with every engineer currently there, ~none of whom have had this conversation yet), probably re-orgs of the engineering team, middle management for first time...
Reply Retweet Like
Patrick McKenzie Sep 12
Replying to @tylertringas
You know technical debt? The engineering team is going through both that and organizational debt; they find themselves needing a bunch of Table Stakes For A Real Company systems and processes which aren't customer visible and which require engineering hours to execute on.
Reply Retweet Like
Patrick McKenzie Sep 12
Replying to @kishorelive
(There are a lot of ways to make that look more professional, and it being handwritten means it is basically guaranteed to generate a follow up from Accounts Payable, but that quick freehanded example has everything you’d need to get $1k out of a US company given they agreed.)
Reply Retweet Like
Patrick McKenzie Sep 12
Replying to @kishorelive
Literally looks something like this.
Reply Retweet Like
Patrick McKenzie Sep 12
Replying to @patio11
I would like our community to develop and replicate the social technology it takes to turn being an OSS maintainer of a successful project into a viable career path, like running a SaaS company, being a startup founder, or taking AppAmaGooBookSoft’s shilling are all options.
Reply Retweet Like
Patrick McKenzie Sep 12
Replying to @patio11
And I’ll admit to a little bit of “If my accountant made a considered decision to just do my taxes for free I’d probably say ‘Well, you’re a professional, clearly you have thought that through’ but I’m fixing an OSS dev’s business at expense of mine due to presumed incapacity.”
Reply Retweet Like
Patrick McKenzie Sep 12
Replying to @patio11
I always feel a little conflicted here with my entrepreneur hat on. When I was running a company I sent $X0k to OSS projects I used, usually after educating them what they’d need to successfully invoice a company.
Reply Retweet Like
Patrick McKenzie Sep 12
Replying to @patio11
I think quite a bit of the change has to come from the OSS community and maintainers. Bluntly, there’s a value pie to be cut, and if we persist in saying “Pie cutting is beneath me; some business should handle that, and I will keep myself aloof from commercials” then crumbs.
Reply Retweet Like
Patrick McKenzie Sep 12
This is a bon mot. Not entirely sure I agree with it, particularly given the spectrums of intensity of founding vs. maintainership, but there needs to be a rethink of the desirability of having agents of for-profit companies routinely expect free labor from professionals.
Reply Retweet Like
Patrick McKenzie Sep 12
Replying to @patio11
The folks who put barriers into becoming bus drivers cite public safety as a rationale, which seems plausible until one realizes that the people who put barriers in front of hair braiders, dog walkers, massage therapists, and similar all say exactly the same words.
Reply Retweet Like
Patrick McKenzie Sep 12
There is someone whose literal job it is to make sure you can’t become a bus driver and there is someone whose literal job it is to make sure maximize your chance of driving a paying fare within countable minutes of engagement with the app. Several hundred someones, actually.
Reply Retweet Like
Patrick McKenzie Sep 12
Replying to @amyhoy
If I were a cynical man I'd say that if you develop cryptocurrency-powered Beanie Babies with the sales pitch that they're going to be worth a lot of money some day because they're cryptocurrency-powered Beanie Babies you understand your market quite well.
Reply Retweet Like
Patrick McKenzie Sep 12
The product whose sole feature was "We are an existence proof that our database/computing stack can be used for things which aren't investment scams" appears to have user retention issues.
Reply Retweet Like
Patrick McKenzie Sep 12
Replying to @kchoudhu
I had some in my funny-money allocation in the IRA and sold it to clean up mental headspace back in 2014 or so. D’oh.
Reply Retweet Like