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The Paris Review
Quarterly literary magazine founded in 1953.
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The Paris Review 5m
“It seemed she had come to understand, on her own, that we always overestimate how much we can control our lives.” From “Witness” by , issue no. 233, Summer 2020:
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The Paris Review 23m
“I can’t help what people think. I don’t care what people think. I only care what I do.” —Walter Mosley
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The Paris Review 1h
“All of us yearn for the highest wisdom, but we have to rely on ourselves in the end.”—Czeslaw Milosz
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The Paris Review 1h
“Verdigris is both toxic and unstable, a fact that Leonardo da Vinci knew, though he still persisted in using it.”
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The Paris Review 2h
“Postcard from Trakl” by John Yau -
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The Paris Review 2h
“You should be conscious of your impact in real life.” —Primo Levi
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The Paris Review 3h
“At least half of your mind is always thinking, I’ll be leaving; this won’t last. It’s a good Buddhist attitude. If I were a Buddhist, this would be a great help. As it is, I’m just sad.” —Anne Carson
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The Paris Review 3h
“He was truly on a trip through the underworld, an idea that had haunted humans for thousands of years. Now it was done, and reasoning about it, even talking about it, was useless.” Brad Fox () on the bathysphere dives:
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The Paris Review 9h
“I don’t like borders. I like edges, but not borders. I can’t be a nationalist. I can’t be a nationalist by dint of the foul history of nationalisms. And I don’t believe in a separate anything.” —Ali Smith
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The Paris Review 10h
“The name Isak means ‘laughter.’ I often think that what we most need now is a great humorist.” —Isak Dinesen
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The Paris Review 11h
“Rather irritatingly, somebody will say, Oh, I’m sure you’re going to write a short story about this. It always seems to me, though, that an experience has to steep for years before suddenly I realize that yes, it’s a short story.” —Penelope Lively
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The Paris Review 11h
“I don’t want to be mediocre; I don’t want to be just another writer. I want to be one of the best, and I don’t think you can be if your heart is elsewhere.”
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The Paris Review 12h
“For the moment it’s enough for me just to be there as much as I can—to witness, to lament, to offer a model of noncomplicity, to pitch in. The duties of a human being, one who believes in right action, not of a writer.” —Susan Sontag
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The Paris Review 13h
“I do know happy marriages, including mine. But why write about something like that? I can’t imagine writing, without irony, about people who are happy all the time.” —Ann Beattie
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The Paris Review 14h
“Being able to converse with cats was Nakata’s little secret. Only he and the cats knew about it.” From “Heigh-Ho” by Haruki Murakami, issue no. 172, Winter 2004
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The Paris Review 14h
“It was my fate to be born in Indiana. I probably would have chosen Edinburgh if you had asked me, or perhaps Rome. But I believe we start with what we are, as writers, and Indiana is a land rich in legend.” —Marguerite Young
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The Paris Review 15h
“May we vicariously sit at these crowded tables, even as there may be empty seats at our own.” This week’s The Art of Distance gathers a selection of brunches, banquets, and sumptuous feasts that have appeared in our pages.
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The Paris Review 15h
“I’m using the first-person singular and trying to make that the first-person plural, so that anybody can read the work and say, Hmm, that’s the truth, yes, uh-huh, and live in the work.” —Maya Angelou
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The Paris Review 16h
“Surely, we understand very little of what is happening to us at any given moment. But by remembering, comparing, waiting to know the consequences, we can sometimes see what an event really meant, what it was trying to teach us.” —Katherine Anne Porter
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The Paris Review 17h
“Showing off to straight men remained a delight and necessity to women of my generation. Those of us who wrote, wrote for men and showed off to them. Our writing had a certain note. I’m not sure I can describe it, but I can hear it.” —Janet Malcolm
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