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Dr Juliet Ó Brien
Migrant anti-fascist anarcha-feminist medievalist philology; arch; paranomasiac moralising facetious analogical foreign academic marginalia; doctritz de trobar
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Dr Juliet Ó Brien 31m
Replying to @obrienatrix
(footnote: “science” above is in its fuller deeper richer sense: sapience, knowledge, the kind that involves wonder and wondering, questioning, questing for meaning, and adventures in understanding)
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Dr Juliet Ó Brien 35m
Replying to @MIT
Source and context (albeit an old translation) thanks to :
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Dr Juliet Ó Brien 36m
Tangent of the day: Aristotle Metaphysics bk 1 ch 2 on free wonder (& science, a.k.a. knowledge) vs. ignorance & utilitarian ends; for academic weekend reading as part of (which is for all citizens of this republic, not just students)
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Dr Juliet Ó Brien 1h
Replying to @ParemQuern
and you’re welcome: please keep asking questions! a.k.a. Socrates’s “philosophy begins in wonder” (Plato, Theaetetus 155c-d; Aristotle, Metaphysics 982b; “wonder” as θαυμάζειν, thaumazein).
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Dr Juliet Ó Brien 1h
Replying to @ParemQuern @GallicaBnF
Something that never fails to delight me: HOW COOL IS IT that the kinds of texts and aspects of life that are the most serious, strict, and stern in 2019—the religious and legal—are also some of the most hilarious brilliant medieval comics?
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Dr Juliet Ó Brien 1h
I get to shock students every year with the idea that, translated into practical terms, being obliged to go to church every day might not be such a bad thing, and several times a day in a monastic life would be awesome.
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Dr Juliet Ó Brien 1h
Replying to @ParemQuern @GallicaBnF
(I thought it was this one, similar style; and there’s *possible* codification of musical information in the colours and patterns of clothing and accessories, as well as bodily gestures; anyway, will keep an eye & ear out on what that other manuscript is.)
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Dr Juliet Ó Brien 2h
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Dr Juliet Ó Brien 2h
can you help? What manuscript am I seeing when I close my eyes? Help appreciated, otherwise I will have nightmares about this tonight.
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Dr Juliet Ó Brien 2h
Replying to @ParemQuern @GallicaBnF
There’s a really cool manuscript from around the same time that has David teaching neumes, sitting around strumming looking like a rock god on MTV Unplugged in the 1990s. Carolingian and musicologist specialists, help? 11th c. CE manuscript? I can visualise it but not the ms ref.
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Dr Juliet Ó Brien 2h
Replying to @ParemQuern @GallicaBnF
Huh. Skimming through the ms (merci ), that section, 104r-114v, is the most heavily decorated & I think it’s just the Gloria, ending with this exuberant “Halleluja.” Performance note: be very bouncy? On cups, a comic note that eucharist / communion is some way off …
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Dr Juliet Ó Brien 2h
Replying to @ParemQuern
Which is why yours was a million-dollar ace question: it’s rare that an image, as in the 4 cases above, is just a depiction of what’s happening in the text. (That last one, for example, is the Gloria; for more on the order of the mass, is a decent start.)
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Dr Juliet Ó Brien 2h
... because this book also has images (see the manuscript online, f. 104r onwards) that illustrate the musical modes; as a teaching and associative-mnemonic tool. A book like this would be for multiple audiences, including learning.
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Dr Juliet Ó Brien 2h
2. performance notes, adding at least some arm-waving gestures 3. intertextual notes: cues connecting previous and later stuff 4. colours and poses can also be an extra musical note, a reminder about being in a certain musical mode …
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Dr Juliet Ó Brien 2h
*the
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Dr Juliet Ó Brien 2h
The manuscript uses images to do several things, often simultaneously: 1. to illustrate a story, for example in one of thr psalms
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Dr Juliet Ó Brien 2h
The “prosaire” part of the manuscript’s name = “processional” in English. This provides the priest’s script, again with variations for different days, starting with entering the church, the “procession” at the beginning of the whole “process.”
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Dr Juliet Ó Brien 2h
(Religion here—very roughly speaking—is at least as much about entertainment, education, solace, respite, & rhythm to the day & week; a break indoors in shelter having a rest, music, meeting up with friends; be this monastics or anyone else. Everyday culture.)
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Dr Juliet Ó Brien 2h
The musical notation is in neumes. These special extensions include story-telling and often inlude dramatic performance, in some manuscripts, that turns into shorter or longer plays.
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Dr Juliet Ó Brien 3h
Footnote (for others reading) on tropers (tropaires): from “trope,” and so called because you’re adding a “change,” new material, to a plainchant to adapt it for a specific occasion; for example, a specific feast-day in the liturgical year.
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