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New York Times Books
All things books from The New York Times. Stop tweeting and read a book.
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New York Times Books 12h
Two months after the first accusation of plagiarism against the Brazilian romance novelist Cristiane Serruya, dozens more have found overlap with their work. Now, one of them, Nora Roberts, is suing.
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New York Times Books 12h
David Baker's best poems build something lovely and durable from the broken world
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New York Times Books 13h
"A number of psychiatry’s practitioners are beginning to concede that 'it overreached, overpromised, overdiagnosed, overmedicated and compromised its principles.'" reviews "Mind Fixers."
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New York Times Books 14h
Norris's irreverent reverence for the history of the Greek language is not only admirable, it is moving
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New York Times Books 14h
"Her isolation is the kind peculiar to big cities, magnified because she is estranged — from the world around her and also from herself. Her loneliness radiates like heat from the pages of this book."
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New York Times Books 15h
Two months after the initial accusations of plagiarism against the Brazilian romance novelist Cristiane Serruya, dozens more writers have found overlap with their work. Now, one of them, Nora Roberts, is suing.
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New York Times Books retweeted
Andrew LaVallee 17h
"A lot of the other writers involved in this, they don’t have the money to fight it,” Ms. Roberts said. “I do have the money.” by
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New York Times Books 16h
"It turns out that psychiatry’s understanding of mental illness is full of hairpin turns and unintended consequences." reviews "Mind Fixers."
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New York Times Books 16h
Two months after the first accusation of plagiarism against the Brazilian romance novelist Cristiane Serruya, dozens more writers have found overlap between their work and Ms. Serruya's. Now, one of them, Nora Roberts, is suing.
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New York Times Books retweeted
Jennifer Szalai 18h
Harrington says that psychiatry ultimately "overreached, overpromised, overdiagnosed, overmedicated and compromised its principles." But she doesn't subscribe to the nihilistic "it's all junk science" argument either. A fascinating history.
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New York Times Books 17h
If Isaiah Berlin were alive today, he would have considered Norris a perfect candidate for inclusion in the category of hedgehog, his famous term for a person who works to know one thing completely
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New York Times Books 18h
Michael Dobbs's new book describing the restrictions on Jews trying to escape the Holocaust holds lessons for the United States today
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New York Times Books 18h
This history of Gutenberg Bible No. 45 is a lively tale of technological innovation, the thrill of the bibliophile’s hunt, greed and betrayal
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New York Times Books 19h
If the Midwest was once a place to indulge in fantasies of innocence and escapism, it is now regarded as the locus of our worst tendencies as a country, a dead zone to offshore national guilt
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New York Times Books 19h
Norris's irreverent reverence for the history of the Greek language is not only admirable, it is moving
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New York Times Books 20h
An account of American immigration policy during World War II seems to have chilling parallels with debates taking place today
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New York Times Books 21h
David Baker is both an autobiographical poet and one obsessed with ephemerality, which makes his new book’s reverse chronology curiously affecting: Parents die and then decline. A marriage ends, then flourishes. A child grows younger.
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New York Times Books 21h
The book follows the Gutenberg as it makes it way around Great Britain, moving from one Downton Abbey-like castle to another, then comes to America, and finally disappears into a Japanese vault
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New York Times Books 22h
"Her isolation is the kind peculiar to big cities, magnified because she is estranged — from the world around her and also from herself. Her loneliness radiates like heat from the pages of this book."
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New York Times Books 24h
From our archives, 4/24/1904: A tailor says that novelists get men's clothing all wrong
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