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The New York Times
Today, the New York Times is launching the , a collection of essays, criticism and art about how the America we know today didn’t start in 1776 — it started in August 1619, when a ship carrying enslaved Africans landed in Virginia
American slavery began 400 years ago this month. This is referred to as the country’s original sin, but it is more than that: It is the country’s true origin.
The New York Times The New York Times @nytimes
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The New York Times Aug 14
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More than 20 enslaved Africans were brought to Virginia 400 years ago this month. This was the moment America began, writes Nikole Hannah-Jones. "Black Americans have also been, and continue to be, foundational to the idea of American freedom."
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The New York Times Aug 14
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The U.S. economy is shaped by management practices invented under slavery, writes Matthew Desmond. "Cotton planters, millers and consumers were fashioning a new economy, one that was global in scope and required the movement of capital, labor and products"
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The New York Times Aug 14
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Why doesn't the U.S. have universal health care? The answer has everything to do with race, writes Jeneen Interlandi. "In the United States, racial health disparities have proved as foundational as democracy itself."
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The New York Times Aug 14
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American democracy holds onto an undemocratic assumption: that some people deserve more power than others, writes Jamelle Bouie. "The government Calhoun envisioned would protect 'liberty': not the liberty of the citizen but the liberty of the master."
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The New York Times Aug 14
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For centuries, black music, forged in bondage, has been the sound of complete artistic freedom. No wonder everybody is always stealing it, writes Wesley Morris. "What you're hearing in black music is a miracle of sound."
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The New York Times Aug 14
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The sugar that saturates the American diet has a barbaric history as the 'white gold' that fueled slavery, writes Khalil Gibran Muhammad. "It was the introduction of sugar slavery in the New World that changed everything."
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The New York Times Aug 14
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But it's not just democracy, American capitalism, health care and music that were shaped by America's history with slavery. Everything from traffic to the wage gap were affected by the institution as well. Read more from the 1619 Project here:
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Progressive GOP Aug 14
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Sadly - media and academia continue to push the dangerous 1619 myth - NYT goes all in “The Misguided Focus on 1619 as the Beginning of Slavery in the U.S. Damages Our Understanding of American History.”
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Mostly Harmless Aug 14
Replying to @NixonandIke @nytimes
Thanks for sharing this. Really interesting. While 1619 seems significant re: the U.S., there is so much more history to slavery throughout the world.
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fspencer Aug 14
It started before then!
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Sarah, like the Duchess of York 👸🏽 Aug 14
Replying to @fspencer @nytimes
YUP
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Some of yall need to taste the Chancla. Aug 14
Actually before 1619, the closest black people came to slavery was indentured servitude, which when it ended, it ended. Blacks owned land, were equal in every way until they realized (after 1619) that they could get away with restrictions on our liberties.
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fspencer Aug 14
Exactly! Black people were here living free long before Britain ever came this way. More accurate history would tell the reality that first Africans, then Spain and France and then Britain came to the Americas.
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Ten Aug 14
Where can I read about this ?
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fspencer Aug 14
One place to start is the book "They Came Before Colombus" by Ivan Van Sertima.
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Ten Aug 14
Thanks, I feel so dumbfounded right now bc I've heard of both the author and this book. Thanks I'll check it out.
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Deplorable Dame ⭐️⭐️⭐️ Aug 14
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What about the Native Americans who were already here?!
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Connie Penner ♫♪ Aug 14
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Whatever happened to all the natives who were here first years before the whites came? It was their land first after all. Why doesn't anyone acknowledge that fact and start from there Can't change facts or the truth.
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JCassidy Aug 14
Replying to @penner_connie @nytimes
They were made slaves too, or completely eradicated. In the SW, they were called Genizaros.
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