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The New Criterion
A monthly review edited by and (exec ed). Arts, politics, culture & more.
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The New Criterion 3h
Coruscating ashes of the maple, like the advent of a migraine, the bristling light both promise and a reformation, take their time, as it were. We would return to those antique particulars, having returned would go again.
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The New Criterion 5h
Most museums, like the BMA now, have “equity, diversity, and inclusion” initiatives. As a practical proposition, these assuage white guilt with urgency but do nothing meaningful for the public or for scholarship.
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The New Criterion 7h
A country in which profit was made from credit, with ruinous interest charged on loans, must impoverish rather than enrich its citizens. Ezra Pound, as Moody puts it, “meant to save America from its anti-American Americans.”
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The New Criterion 9h
The public usually becomes inured to bad design, through a combination of familiarity and the inability to imagine something better, but the photographs of Penn Station in all its Roman glory are a constant reminder that it does not have to be this way.
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The New Criterion 11h
The Communists and Nazis made the Jacobins look like amateurs, a mere dress rehearsal for a much more thoroughgoing totalitarian assault on decency, liberty, and human nature. In some profound way, Burke saw it all coming.
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The New Criterion 13h
The practical, Utopian, playful, and earnest Kibbo Kift was a “camping fraternity” combining “the ideals of scientists and Red Indians.” Well, sort of/not really, but that’ll do for now. Subscribe for ten issues and archive access:
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The New Criterion 15h
Morisot’s pictures move. In their brevity and rhythm, the paintings are unlike those of any Impressionist you could care to name.
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The New Criterion 17h
The moral of the story is that reason and prudence will keep you safe. But it’s not so easy in Kafka’s world, where reason and prudence are precisely what make life very difficult indeed.
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The New Criterion 20h
They might be small—few are much larger than a postcard—but the plein air oil sketches at the Morgan Library & Museum are stunningly immersive landscapes from northern Europe.
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The New Criterion 22h
The Bournemouth Song Book is a work to make you weak with laughter.
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The New Criterion Jan 18
Heart’s red fountain; can it soak the dun acres? North, an arid wind; and what does it intend? Cover, cover the earth, tangle the hair he stroked.
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The New Criterion Jan 18
Hadrian proceeded to style himself Restitutor Orbis Terrarum, “restorer” of the lands of the world. But what “restoration” he brought to Britannia remains unclear.
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The New Criterion Jan 18
The Bournemouth Song Book is a work to make you weak with laughter.
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The New Criterion Jan 18
White’s lithographs, which take full advantage of the medium’s potential for saturated blacks and seamless transitions, reward close attention.
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The New Criterion Jan 18
Adding to the enigma is this puzzling fact: in his last decades, White was internationally renowned, but his reputation has since gradually faded, even while, today, his admiring former students are increasingly celebrated.
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The New Criterion Jan 18
Over the years, Brazil had become a cesspool of corruption and despair. The fact that people didn’t talk about God and didn’t bring their faith to the public square was certainly part of the problem.
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The New Criterion Jan 18
Kirk’s thriller of a novel of 1961, titled “Old House of Fear,” became a surprise bestseller. Kirk said it outsold all of his other books.
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Pegasus Books Jan 18
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Russell Kirk Center Jan 18
Far from being a man whose conservatism is unsuited for our time, Russell Kirk’s spirit and politics are more apt than ever. -
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The New Criterion Jan 18
Daniel J. Mahoney on Russell Kirk & the politics of prudence.
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