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Scottish Natural Heritage
Scotland’s nature agency. We work to protect and improve our natural environment in Scotland.
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Scottish Natural Heritage 3h
Want to in your life? During lockdown many of us spent more time outdoors and reported benefits from being in nature. Try a nature survey...submit sightings of birds, frogs, butterflies and more - it makes a difference.
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Scottish Natural Heritage 11h
More stormy ahead for parts of tonight. Please share if you get any storm photos. This one was captured by Gary Cree in in the small hours this morning.
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Scottish Natural Heritage 12h
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Dave Craig 15h
Informative article here on lighting of & use when or, as have appropriately referred to it, . away from roads & habitation should never be referred to as .
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Scottish Natural Heritage 14h
Great to see nature increasingly becoming part of people's "everyday life".
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Scottish Natural Heritage 17h
Looking forward to next spring already :)
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Scottish Natural Heritage 17h
Our Guide to Best Practice for Watching Marine Wildlife has further info, including species-specific behaviours to look out for & sensitive times and places
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Scottish Natural Heritage 18h
Sea stacks are sculptured by nature over very long periods of time, with the wind and waves as her tools. Orkney's 570 miles of coastline features several of these formations - this example is a relatively small one known as Stackabank. (C)Kim McEwan
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Scottish Natural Heritage Aug 11
A fantastic opportunity for a special someone - do you know that someone? Please share if you think you might
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Scottish Natural Heritage Aug 11
It's amazing what one person can do to help nature - making things better for people too :)
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Scottish Natural Heritage Aug 11
For today's , we're taking you away to beautiful Craig Meagaidh reserve, with some pictures from reserve manager, Rory. We particularly like the cow buried in purple moor grass! Its grazing is helping to restore areas of heath.
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Scottish Natural Heritage Aug 11
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Scottish Natural Heritage Aug 11
Top tips worth sharing to help new campers be responsible campers from
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Scottish Natural Heritage Aug 11
In Scotland, cottongrass was used to dress wounds during the First World War. It's commonly seen growing on boggy ground, so be prepared to get soggy socks if you walk through it! Hence it's also known as bog cotton. (C)Kim McEwan
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Scottish Natural Heritage Aug 10
Island treasures - the islands on Loch Lomond are one of the wildest places among our National Nature Reserves. Rarely visited, they offer stunning views across the loch that few people get the chance to see without a boat. Take a trip over on the blog:
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Scottish Natural Heritage Aug 10
Last week saw some changes on the Isle of May with autumn just around the corner. Find out how the island's wildlife is changing with the calendar over on the blog:
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Scottish Invasive Species Initiative Aug 10
Whose been walking along my river? 🐾 Our project officer Mirella came across these prints on the lower River Spey at the weekend. Soft mud is a great place to look for prints. Do let us know if you find any signs or see one - email; sisi@nature.scot
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Scottish Natural Heritage Aug 10
The mystery of the mini oak trees 🕵️‍♀️Find out why it's surprising to see oak seedlings appearing at our Flanders Moss National Nature Reserve and who - or what - could be responsible (hint: you may find a clue in an earlier post today!)
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Scottish Natural Heritage Aug 10
Today's is another wonderful video, captured by our photographer Lorne showing a jay foraging for food in a Scots pine wood.
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Scottish Natural Heritage Aug 10
Continue to in your life. From mowing less and providing a pond, to contributing to nature surveys and sharing plant cuttings with friends, our can really help nature. It's good for you too 💚🐞⛅
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