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National Geographic
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National Geographic 56m
From 1869 to 1881, Jesse James may have taken part in as many as 19 robberies—banks, trains, and stagecoaches—stretching from Mississippi to Minnesota
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National Geographic 2h
In April 2015, Nepal experienced a powerful and devastating 7.8-magnitude earthquake—and it likely wasn't the worst the region has in store
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National Geographic 3h
Watch the rescued slow lorises experience their first taste of freedom in the wild
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National Geographic 4h
Altogether, the freezers at the Smithsonian's National Zoo hold more than 16,000 milk samples procured from more than 200 species of mammals—but why?
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National Geographic 6h
Hermit crabs have large enough sexual organs to reproduce without exiting their shells—a safe way to keep rivals from stealing them
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National Geographic 8h
In the Bahamas, the slugs are finding it increasingly difficult to reproduce—which they have to do in large groups
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National Geographic 11h
Like the tragic tale of Romeo and Juliet, the story of the lamp and moth is one of fatal attraction
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National Geographic 14h
Can you tell which eye belongs to which animal? Vivid close-ups invite us to image how our fellow creatures see the world
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National Geographic 16h
For hundreds of years, different cultures around the world have used caves as spaces for worship, meditation, art, and burials—these are just some of them
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National Geographic 18h
Lithium makes up only 0.002% of the Earth's crust, but has become a major component of technology and industry
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National Geographic 19h
As the global human population steadily climbs, scientists are scrambling to devise a diet plan that can feed 10 billion people by 2050
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National Geographic 20h
"An early morning at the infamous Maroon Bells in Colorado," writes photographer Molly McCormick. "This is one of my favorite spots, it never gets old."
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National Geographic 21h
Three hundred million years ago, Earth was home to a strange creature the size of a small dog—that had a surprisingly advanced form of locomotion
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National Geographic 22h
Replying to @NatGeo
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National Geographic 22h
The Philippine eagle, one of the largest eagle species in the world, is known for its ability to carry off monkeys as prey
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National Geographic 23h
Shark fins were banned to reduce instances of finning, which involves slicing fins off sharks and tossing the wounded animals overboard
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National Geographic 24h
Warmer oceans fuel stronger storms, hurt coral habitats, and put stress on fisheries—among many other unwelcome changes to the planet
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National Geographic Jan 16
Today, a new global study confirmed that permafrost is thawing quickly across much of the world, with the greatest warming seen in parts of Siberia
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National Geographic Jan 16
With a jaw capable of generating 4,450 newtons of force, lion bites are something most animals want to avoid—but pangolins are not most animals
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National Geographic Jan 16
Sound is so elemental to life and survival that it prompted Tel Aviv University researcher Lilach Hadany to ask: What if it wasn’t just animals that could sense sound—what if plants could, too?
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