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National Geographic
Since its inception nearly 130 years ago, the core purpose of National Geographic has been to further the knowledge and awareness of our world.
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National Geographic 2h
Did you know: Some moths live on sloths. See more from
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National Geographic 3h
Even on the high cliffs of Yosemite or in the caves of Malaysia, adventurers must learn to turn off their brains
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National Geographic 4h
Fifteen years ago there were only 22 marmots left on Vancouver Island—now they're making a comeback
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National Geographic 5h
We recently asked our readers where they have witnessed the most impressive sunsets. Here are just a few of our favorite recommendations
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National Geographic 6h
At an event in Nevada, hobbyists have the rare opportunity to send their homemade rockets high into the atmosphere (legally)
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National Geographic 7h
"It seems to me that in the future our landscapes will look like this," writes photographer Anastasiya Sak
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National Geographic 8h
Gorgeous, dangerous, and brainless—jellyfish are a slippery mass of contradictions
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National Geographic 9h
Founded in 1872, the wild heart of America is home to an abundance of natural beauty and awe-inspiring wildlife
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National Geographic 10h
While helium is the second most abundant element in the universe, it's a slippery thing to grab ahold of on Earth
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National Geographic 11h
Originating in pre-Columbian Mesoamerica, the awe-inspiring Dance of the Flyers is a dangerous acrobatic ritual to call for rain
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National Geographic 12h
The plight of bees has spurred interest in honey, giving people an opportunity to sell, cook, and experiment with it. Want to help? Make a beeline for these cities
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National Geographic 14h
Magnets may be the perfect antidote to unwanted shark attention while fishing. Here's how it works
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National Geographic 16h
Helium was discovered 150 years ago today during a solar eclipse. Given its discovery near the sun, this element was named after the Greek god of the sun, Helios
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National Geographic 19h
Entire reptile populations may be dropping due to cats
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National Geographic 21h
much appreciated for joining us on yet another amazing show; we shall be here next week- same place and same time. See you all soon, for the grand finale of the Gauntlet
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National Geographic 21h
great to see the lions playing on the aftershow here: ; play helps these cubs gain the skills they will need in future to kill their prey and also fight off enemies;
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National Geographic 21h
often they roar at night; to advertise their territories and communicate with fellow members of the pride; males have a deeper roar than females.... please keep following the show here:
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National Geographic 21h
not unless they die from other reasons, they will reach the peak at 5 years old, then live up to 10 years old or more; so most die after 10 years. Often around 13 years... the show is still live here:
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National Geographic 21h
it is possibly due to the difference in time zones; let's hope to see more of that lion action:
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National Geographic 21h
much welcome; the show goes on here:
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