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Erika Hall
Talking about creating "delightful" user experiences is actually user-hostile when it wrongly presumes that your customer wants to be emotionally involved with your service at all. Fast and invisible are often the better parts of delight.
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Erika Hall 17 May 18
Replying to @mulegirl
You want delightful? Get my new book. It’s a tomato:
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Dan Craddock 17 May 18
Replying to @mulegirl
If a website played ‘Groove Is In The Heart’ while you were onboarding, would you consider that a Dee-Lite-ful experience? 🤷‍♂️
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Erika Hall 17 May 18
Replying to @slowburnweb
Yes. Thank you. I was waiting for that joke.
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Jeff Chausse 16 May 18
Replying to @mulegirl
Delight doesn’t necessarily mean “fun”. It can just mean a system is unexpectedly easy. Example: Ask me for my zip code first and figure out the city and state automatically. Non-emotionally delightful!
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Ali Lozoff 20 Jun 18
Replying to @JeffChausse @mulegirl
The fact that this isn’t an automatic function on all shipping sites is maddening. Zip codes could not possibly be more specific than what city and state you are in.
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Erika Hall 20 Jun 18
Replying to @AliLozoff @JeffChausse
Yeah. I don't want to water down delight like that. Using that term makes functional design sound optional. We should expect shipping systems to figure out city and state from Zip, and credit card type from 4 digits.
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Ali Lozoff 20 Jun 18
Replying to @mulegirl @JeffChausse
THATS MY OTHER ONE. I agree there’s a distinction between delight and expectations.
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Jeff Chausse 20 Jun 18
Replying to @AliLozoff @mulegirl
Perhaps not a perfect example. My point was that delight can mean “works much better/smarter than expected”. It doesn’t have to be emotional.
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Jeff Chausse 20 Jun 18
Replying to @AliLozoff @mulegirl
Here’s another example. No one assumes this functionality exists, but it’s delightful to discover that it does.
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Whitney Quesenbery 16 May 18
Replying to @mulegirl @danachis
Exactly. Delight has to be defined by the people who use something, not by those who make it. Delight may be a small, unexpected consideration for your time, attention, or other needs.
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Dana Chisnell 17 May 18
Funny this should come up. and I taught our Delight workshop yesterday at . Our framework is about pleasure, flow, and meaning. And, as points out, each of those is determined by what delights users.
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Dana Chisnell 17 May 18
Pleasure is about exceeding expectations. Flow relates to simple interaction — the fewest, simplest steps, focusing on the user’s immediate next action. Meaning is all about promises made and kept by the organization.
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Whitney Quesenbery 17 May 18
Great quote from Gosford Park. "It’s the gift of anticipation. And I’m a good servant. I’m the perfect servant. I know when they will be hungry and the food is ready. I know when they will be tired and the beds are turned down. I know it before they know it themselves."
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Dana Chisnell 17 May 18
It is that Helen Mirren character that I had in mind when I first came to the “pleasure” facet. Also, anything Helen does is A+++
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Hills to die on 16 May 18
Replying to @mulegirl
I think this is just a critical aspect of defining what we mean with things like “delight”. Sometimes delight means fast and invisible, we just need to be explicit about that. It’s not a problem with delight, it’s a problem with defining it on our terms, rather than the user’s.
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Chad Mortensen 16 May 18
Replying to @mulegirl
Delight is being pleasantly surprised. So if you expect something to be laborious and it turns out to be quick and easy. So delightful!
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meghscase 16 May 18
That's not actually what delight means. It means means please someone greatly or great pleasure. For most experiences most of us work on, it's almost absurd to think we're out there delighting anyone even with the best content, UX, and design.
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meghscase 16 May 18
If we define delight as our products simply not completely sucking, we might want to think about raising the bar a tad.
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Jared Hill 17 May 18
But what if the product not completely sucking does create great pleasure for a user? Surely we should define it from a user's POV, rather than a product POV?
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meghscase 17 May 18
Have you ever been delighted by something working as it should? Like, "Oh, I'm so delighted, my ice cubes are actually frozen!"
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Chad Mortensen 17 May 18
I was delighted when I first tried Uber and how it took a laborious thing like calling a taxi and made it easy. It just worked where it hadn’t before.
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meghscase 17 May 18
Were you pleasantly surprised (as you define delight) or did it cause you great pleasure (the actual definition)? Serious question ... because words matter. Not being a smartass. It takes a lot to cause me great pleasure. Doesn't mean, I'm not like, "oh cool."
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Chad Mortensen 17 May 18
I think that’s where we are at, great pleasure is subjective and unique to the person. I’m not sure I have a solid line between great pleasure and pleasure so something just working did it for me.
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