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Morten Rand-Hendriksen
Senior Staff Instructor, LinkedIn Learning () + Lynda. Feminist. Talks ethics, web, philosophy, information. Loves to dance. Opinionated.
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Morten Rand-Hendriksen 2h
"thorny" is my middle name.
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Morten Rand-Hendriksen 2h
I don't have an answer, I have a million questions.
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Morten Rand-Hendriksen 2h
Better way: - if I create something, people may use it for bad things. - I should figure out what those bad things are and identify who might do them. - my license should alert users to these bad things and say, explicitly, these bad things should not be done.
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Morten Rand-Hendriksen 3h
I fear we are aging out of the workforce
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Morten Rand-Hendriksen 3h
My school got its first internet connected computer when I was in 10th grade. It lived in the library and you had to get permission to use it.
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Morten Rand-Hendriksen 4h
"Bots? There are no bots, only real flesh and blood people who speak like broken form input scripts."
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Morten Rand-Hendriksen 4h
Replying to @camcavers
The more you know.
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Morten Rand-Hendriksen retweeted
RΛMIN NΛSIBOV Jul 20
Filming a chocolate commercial
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Morten Rand-Hendriksen 5h
ESL thoughts: calling a lover "baby" is literal infantilization.
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Morten Rand-Hendriksen 5h
Thats why the black and white approach we take may be problematic: the issue is more nuanced than the absolutist interpretation of the term "freedom" applied. Freedom is many things, and different freedoms may cancel each other out. Vaguely related example
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Morten Rand-Hendriksen 7h
You can, unless the license prohibits it, identify potential risks associated with certain uses and state such uses do not fall within the license. Doesn't stop anyone from using it, but shows you are aware of the issue and more importantly makes you think about it before release
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Morten Rand-Hendriksen 7h
That's a bit of a false equivalency not appropriate to coding languages than software. A better analogy would be whether the manufacturers and distributors of Zyklon B had an ethical responsibility and culpability for it's use.
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Morten Rand-Hendriksen 7h
... and your name is on it, permanently, without you having any ability to communicate your objection from within the code.
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Morten Rand-Hendriksen 7h
Good:Canada to accept up to 250 Syrian White Helmet volunteers, family after dramatic escape Bad: I've seen Canadians and Americans distribute the "White Helmets are a terrorist organization" memes from Russia and Syria over the past year.
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Morten Rand-Hendriksen 8h
This is the archetypal example of the political divide between "left" and "right": private vs public, taxes for all vs individual pays, communal access vs corporate gain. via
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Morten Rand-Hendriksen 8h
Replying to @krle85
That's part of the question.
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Morten Rand-Hendriksen 16h
Replying to @thenetworkhub
The internet is turning us into dumb drones who will do anything for 2 seconds of YouTube fame.
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Morten Rand-Hendriksen 16h
Replying to @PRwebcare
Nice!
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Morten Rand-Hendriksen 16h
Replying to @scottsweb @jeffr0 and 2 others
Turn it around. This is an exercise in "what does the license give us license to do?" If restrictions were possible, it could change how we think about the consequences of releasing our code into the world, ie a restriction indicates something could be used for bad things.
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Morten Rand-Hendriksen 16h
Most software has clear stipulations about what uses are considered acceptible.
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