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Justin Falcone
"you didn't explain anything, you just described an analogy in terms of a more complex analogy" | they/them
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Justin Falcone 4h
Replying to @acemarke
Where's the option for "lobby TC39 for an implementation of structural equality"
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Justin Falcone 4h
Replying to @ticky
I think it's weird that one would advertise this as a *replacement* for media queries, vs something that can do what media queries cannot
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Justin Falcone 4h
Replying to @ticky
You are describing "container queries", which are distinct from "media queries"
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Justin Falcone 6h
Replying to @emplums
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Justin Falcone 8h
Replying to @JoshWComeau
I know what this feature is for; the tweet I'm responding to says "no media queries"
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Justin Falcone 8h
Replying to @modernserf
"Finally, you can replace 2 lines of CSS with 12 lines of JS! (Except on any browser besides Chrome)"
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Justin Falcone 8h
ResizeObserver is great but I do not understand this sales pitch; why would you use this to replace css media queries?
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Justin Falcone May 18
Replying to @davidjgurney
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Justin Falcone retweeted
the affable llkats May 18
the best workplace perk I can think of would be to join a company with a thriving and democratic tech workers union
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Justin Falcone May 18
Replying to @modernserf
to be clear: i am looking for researched articles, not your reckons
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Justin Falcone May 18
I'm not sure how to google for this: why is it that cuts in audio feel jarring, but cuts in video are not?
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Justin Falcone retweeted
meatsock May 18
open for a surprise
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Justin Falcone retweeted
yung money monocot May 18
"in this andean weaving, dating to the year 1000, we see one of the earliest depictions of the noid. and even in this distant era, the noid was emblematic of mortal triumph over the adversity of chaos."
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Justin Falcone May 18
i kind of wonder what a framework built around CSS Houdini would look like. We're probably *years* away from enough support to actually use it on the web, but it might be plausible for Electron apps
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Justin Falcone May 17
Replying to @modernserf
but I still sometimes wonder what writing React would feel like if you could `use` any arbitrary render prop-using component
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Justin Falcone May 17
Replying to @modernserf
IIRC the issue described with `useBailout` is pretty similar to a common issue with Redux + shouldComponentUpdate in the old Context model
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Justin Falcone May 17
Replying to @modernserf
I suspect the answer is "its not, there's actually a bunch of stuff that's subtly broken when you try to jam it into the component tree"
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Justin Falcone May 17
Replying to @modernserf
The answer in Dan's article -- because that would make them less composable -- is well argued, but feels a little unsatisfying. If `useBailout` would break composition in hooks, why is its equivalent in components ok?
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Justin Falcone May 17
Replying to @modernserf
And when people figure this out, they wonder why hooks can't do _everything_ that you can do with render props -- why can't hooks provide context? why can't they control rendering?
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Justin Falcone May 17
Replying to @modernserf
in some sense, you can think of hooks as "just" a flattening of components with render props, e.g. <State defaultValue={x}>{(value, setState) => ...}</State> becomes [value, setState] = useState(x) ....
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