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Marc Lipsitch
Infectious disease epidemiologist and microbiologist, aspirational barista. mlipsitc@hsph.harvard.edu Director
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Marc Lipsitch 22h
Depends what you read. The dissenter said send the regs back to make them equal as far as I understand and pointed out that groceries are not sustained contact at hi density. Majority just struck down
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Marc Lipsitch 23h
Replying to @_Credible_Hulk
Treat all gatherings equally. That’s all I would advocate
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Marc Lipsitch 23h
Taking advantage of record low turkey prices for a safe stroll
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Marc Lipsitch Nov 26
The self-proclaimed pro-life justices are privileging ritual above life. Communicable disease control requires sacrificing some personal desires to protect others.
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Marc Lipsitch retweeted
𝙀𝙡𝙞 𝙋𝙚𝙧𝙚𝙣𝙘𝙚𝙫𝙞𝙘𝙝 🤚 🧼😷 Nov 26
Re: AstraZeneca-University of Oxford vaccine One word could explain the differential results: Blinding Blinding is allocation concealment in a randomized trial, such that the recipient of the vaccine (and others) don't know whether they received the vaccine or placebo 1/6
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Marc Lipsitch Nov 25
Given that these are 1 screwing the country over and 2 what his billionaire supporters would want it is hard to distinguish maximizing his impact in line w his promises with just trying to wreck the country as much as possible. No change there then.
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Bill McCarthy Nov 25
Thankful as a fact-checker for , , , , and other epidemiologists who have helped debunk endless COVID-19 misinformation, and for election law experts like who have had their work cut out this month.
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Radcliffe Institute Nov 24
To what extent is our future with knowable? Join us on 12/8, when epidemiologists Caroline Buckee and consider the epidemic in light of all that we've learned. moderates.
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Marc Lipsitch Nov 24
Or aka Total Landscaping
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Marc Lipsitch Nov 24
Looking forward to reading this from a group including two super past collaborators and Statistical deconvolution for inference of infection time series
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Marc Lipsitch Nov 24
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Miranda van Tilburg Nov 15
Scientists spend 30 to 40% of their time writing and reviewing grants, instead of doing research (i.e. discovering useful and actionable stuff). And the chance of funding success (i.e. ‘winning’ $ to do your job) is about 10%. “It’s soul destroying”.
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Marc Lipsitch Nov 23
Interesting interview w Dr Deborah Fuller on COVID-19 vaccines
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Marc Lipsitch Nov 23
This is true. If comparisons were to all placebos then the results could be confounded by diff risks in diff groups. Even if each compared to contemporary placebos the difference cd be due to something besides dose. And seems likely that the difference could’ve arisen by chance
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Paul Sax Nov 22
1/ Another excellent spirited defense of frequent home testing for as a public health tool by . Cannot recommend this highly enough.
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Marc Lipsitch Nov 23
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Boston Review Nov 23
In addition to our 4 regular print books, we just released a special supplement! Featuring leading epidemiologists, philosophers, social scientists, and more, THINKING IN A PANDEMIC explores 's crisis of science and policy. Order now:
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Marc Lipsitch Nov 23
have to wait to see the data. Leaky not the issue -- it's whether it reduces infection or shedding. I think the animal data shouldn't be overinterpreted -- quadruple challenge (4 body sites) designed to infect most animals.
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Rajeev Venkayya MD Nov 23
This piece from focuses on a key question: does a prevent infection? If so, it could reduce asymptomatic transmission in the community. But this isn't the only way a vaccine can reduce transmission and slow the pandemic. Thread. 1/
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Marc Lipsitch Nov 23
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