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Mint Lounge
's Saturday magazine of culture, books, sports, style and ideas.
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Mint Lounge retweeted
Bibek Bhattacharya Nov 18
Once upon a time, there were some very popular Indian goddesses who were Kali’s competitors for worship. Then they were appropriated by her cult. This is their story. My article for .
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Mint Lounge Nov 18
After one too many imperfect sausages, a traveller from Deutschland finally finds an authentic German dish in Mumbai.
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Mint Lounge Nov 18
From offbeat decor to quirky wall art, these Instagram accounts promise innovation, intrigue and a good-looking feed.
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Mint Lounge Nov 18
Growing up as a teenage rock music fan in Calcutta (long before it was renamed Kolkata) was hard, remembers .
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Mint Lounge Nov 18
Mountaineer Dipankar Ghosh suffered a debilitating accident while summiting one of the world’s highest peaks—it changed him forever.
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Mint Lounge Nov 17
Kafe Moskova in Helsinki is a tribute to Soviet-era bars as well as owner Aki Kaurismäki’s quirky sense of humour, writes .
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Mint Lounge Nov 17
Eco-friendly merrymaking has been embraced for decades. It just happens to go in and out of public consciousness.
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Mint Lounge Nov 17
"There’s no future for design because we are entering the era of bionism and dematerialization...in the coming years, all the useless things around us will disappear one by one becoming completely integrated," French designer Philippe Starck tells
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Mint Lounge Nov 17
Replying to @Mint_Lounge
Over the years, the staple Indian outfit has bid farewell to billowy bottoms and the dupatta has become a dispensable element.
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Mint Lounge retweeted
Natasha Badhwar Nov 17
"...for all the guilt, horror, trauma and confusion that followed my rape, it never occurred to me that I had anything to be ashamed of,” writes in this clear-eyed, unsentimental, searingly realistic book about rape and the rest of life.
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Mint Lounge Nov 17
| People believe there is will, self-control and sacrifice, and a combination of these qualities is discipline. But what if, in reality, discipline is a false public front for private procedures, writes .
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Mint Lounge retweeted
Anindita Ghose Nov 16
“When my mother made pakhala (fermented rice), she’d also roast a tomato or eggplant and make a mash with garlic and mustard oil. There’d be these little bowls of fried things to go with it...” Great fun talking to on things Made in Odisha
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Mint Lounge Nov 17
This exclusive excerpt from 's new book on women’s cricket in India revisits a record-breaking knock at the 2017 World Cup.
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Mint Lounge Nov 17
Trafalgar CEO speaks to on growing up in apartheid South Africa, the problem of over-tourism and his love for snowboarding.
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Mint Lounge Nov 16
Replying to @Mint_Lounge
As Indian fashion takes steps towards a global sensibility, the salwar-kameez is poised to be our sartorial emblem—an ensemble of androgynous, gender-neutral origins, a uniform for corporate leaders, politicians, celebrities and working women, from baby boomers to millennials.
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Mint Lounge Nov 16
Replying to @Mint_Lounge
By the early 2000s, hyper-feminine costumes began to gradually make way for minimal ensembles that emphasized on convenience and new lifestyle choices. Kareena Kapoor’s patialas paired with T-shirts in 'Jab We Met' (2007) sparked off new trends among young women in the country.
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Mint Lounge Nov 16
Replying to @Mint_Lounge
In the 1990s, Indian designers reinterpreted the garment in contemporary ways—Ritu Kumar's block-print kurtas gained such repute that Princess Diana ordered a few sets for her visit to Pakistan in 1996; Abu Jani-Sandeep Khosla reworked traditional kalidar kurtas into anarkalis.
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Mint Lounge Nov 16
Replying to @Mint_Lounge
A fitted kameez with slits stitched up and churidar became popular in the 1960s, supposedly inspired by Jacqueline Kennedy’s attire; the silhouette was worn by actresses like Sadhana, Saira Banu, Asha Parekh, Sharmila Tagore in their movies.
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Mint Lounge Nov 16
Replying to @Mint_Lounge
Unlike the sari, which is rooted in India, the salwar-kameez is a Central Asian import. Mughal and Pahari miniatures from the 17th and 18th centuries depict women in ankle-length garments, like a gown called peshwaz teamed with straight fitted pyjama.
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Mint Lounge Nov 16
Replying to @Mint_Lounge
The three-piece garment, traditional to certain Muslim communities and the states of Punjab, Haryana, Kashmir and parts of Gujarat and Uttar Pradesh has undergone numerous design modifications with options like slim fit trousers, palazzos and ankle-length kameez.
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