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Michael Mehaffy
Urbanist, explorer of pattern languages, wiki, structuralism, consilience. PhD Delft. Practitioner, itinerant prof at 6 grad schools/4 countries/3 disciplines.
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Michael Mehaffy Feb 14
A more concise edited version (around 15 minutes) - with new patterns from the and other new challenges.
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Michael Mehaffy Feb 14
Discussing how to build an environmental pattern language on a new "federated" wiki platform, with wiki inventor . With new patterns from the and other new challenges. Edited conversation.
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Michael Mehaffy Feb 13
Replying to @WardCunningham
It was a lot easier than taking notes! :-)
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Michael Mehaffy Feb 13
How can pattern languages be taken to the next level, using the insights of the software community? How can a new kind of wiki repository be constructed using 's "Federated Wiki" platform? A discussion with Ward about a new pilot project...
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Michael Mehaffy Jan 28
"In a troubling time of divisive assaults on democratic processes, it seems more important than ever to champion democracy—down to its neighborhood grass roots." New essay in Planetizen about recent developments in Portland, with Suzanne Lennard.
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Michael Mehaffy Jan 27
It is the "crack cocaine" of economic development, e.g. in Phoenix - creating a quick intense high, then a (planetary) hangover. We can't deny the need for economic development, but need to find a more sustainable approach! Most get that. (Including China.)
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Michael Mehaffy Jan 27
I did research on this in relation to GHG emissions - other metrics are similar. There are many factors and the "Goldilocks zone" depends on context, but generally is between 10 and 100 DU/AC. Below that you get car dependency, above it you get "vertical sprawl" and other negs.
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Michael Mehaffy Jan 22
I'm very fond of this quote. See also
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Michael Mehaffy Jan 16
Cities generate benefits from concentrations of talent—but also from “spreading it around.” Striking a balance results in more equity and a more resilient economy.
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Michael Mehaffy Jan 11
Replying to @IMCLconference
Jimmy Carter builds walls, maybe Trump could too? ;)
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Michael Mehaffy Jan 9
Replying to @sethalow
Of course urbanism is made of walls - and doors and gates, and spaces to share. Every country and every householder needs to decide who gets in, and for how long. I think the issue is one of scale and appropriateness, versus one of symbolism, paranoia, and emotional manipulation.
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Michael Mehaffy Jan 8
Replying to @magnus_gao @tjhfx
Yes, a number of associates of Chris are involved (I was manager of his UK office as well as a collaborator in other ways). We are also working with the Center for Environmental Structure on a proposed "in association with" (Chris' wife, daughter and some other colleagues)...
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Michael Mehaffy Jan 8
The draft is available for download and comment! A Pattern Language for Growing Regions: Economy, Technology, Quality of Life. Introducing an on-line wiki repository of new patterns, with collaboration of Ward Cunningham and others (TBC later this year).
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Michael Mehaffy Jan 3
Fascinating conference where I spoke about implementing the New Urban Agenda and especially its emphasis on public space networks. China is beginning to make major reforms in urbanization away from sprawl -- quite hopeful and fascinating.
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Michael Mehaffy Dec 31
The draft is done! A Pattern Language for Growing Regions: Economy, Technology, Quality of Life. Review copy available soon, comments appreciated - now the bigger goal for the New Year: a wiki open-source repository of patterns! With Takashi Iba (L) and Ward Cunningham (R).
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Michael Mehaffy Dec 19
I don't know about this case, but we tried very hard to get the County and City to lower speeds on Cornell and Century. It's 45 on Cornell, 40 on Century - meaning many drive closer to 50 or 55. As the research shows, that's too damn fast, if you don't want to kill people.
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Michael Mehaffy Nov 28
Yes, polycentrism is not a silver bullet, offers no guarantee - it's a tool, to be used in concert with others...
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Michael Mehaffy Nov 28
Exploring the central importance of public spaces at the AfriCities Summit in Marrakesh: Implementing the New Urban Agenda, and delivering on the promise of cities. Report from two sessions, with steps toward a knowledge-sharing platform.
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Michael Mehaffy Nov 28
By the way, Jane Jacobs talked about the unique American contribution of the Cartesian grid that is then sliced (e.g. Broadway in Manhattan) or broken (e.g. Market Street in San Francisco) creating some powerful urban experiences (e.g. also the grid breaks in New Orleans etc.)
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Michael Mehaffy Nov 28
Bill Hillier also talks about the "deformed grid" - a kind of combination of the spider web and grid... which is what tends to happen over time (e.g. when you start with Roman castra and they evolve into medieval villages, and finally polycentric cities, etc.)
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