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Michael Bolton
I solve testing problems that other people can't solve, and I teach people how they can do it too.
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Michael Bolton 2h
Replying to @NormDeploom @pg5150
And maybe putting the driver/owners on a public bastinado, in stocks, to be pelted with rotten vegetables and ordure.
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Michael Bolton 2h
Replying to @NormDeploom @pg5150
That, and “impounding”, “confiscating”.
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Michael Bolton retweeted
Aleksandra Kornecka 6h
Do you know there is great chance to meet Gáspár Nagy, Iris Pinkster, , , and other amazing professionals? 17-19th June in ^^
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Michael Bolton 10h
Check out Rapid Software Testing () for yourself () to find out why you want to register for RST Explored () in Zurich, May 15-17 (). And please tell friends!
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Michael Bolton 11h
The experiment can't prove that customer happiness and conversion can be improved. It *can* provide support for the hypothesis, or it can falsify the hypothesis. The experiment doesn't fail in either case; it address risk associated with ignorance, oblivion, or overconfidence.
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Michael Bolton 11h
This is the first time I've heard of this form of sociopathic behaviour. Wow.
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Michael Bolton 11h
That would be my answer: _there's a risk_ that the hypothesis is wrong. There is an opportunity, for sure, and we want to examine and learn things associated with that, in the interest of finding out whether we're wrong about the opportunity or our choices for grasping it.
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Michael Bolton 12h
It seems to me that your hypothesis in that case would be "A is a better way of drawing attention to a particular product than B"; or "A is a more pleasurable way for our customers to get the information they need than B", or some such. Have I got that right?
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Michael Bolton 12h
If there's an opportunity, why bother experimenting? Why not Just Do It, taking the opportunity?
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Michael Bolton 14h
If I remember it right, I remember recounting something from "Waltzing with Bears": "In a can-do environment, risk management becomes criminalized."
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Michael Bolton 14h
I suspect that we will find—eventually— that there were testers and engineers and test pilots with a critical, risk-focused mindset on the project. And that they did speak up, and that they were drowned out by economics and internal politics, because "it works".
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Michael Bolton 14h
Whoa! With that background, I'd like to hear more from you.
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Michael Bolton retweeted
Melissa Perri 17h
When will companies realize that Accenture & McKinsey, and other large firms are not actually good at modern software dev? Shop small. There’s a ton of small shops out there that would have KILLED this, and also done it for a fraction.
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Michael Bolton 15h
OK. :) The hypothesis relates to that. But what is that hypothesis, and why do we want to prove it? CAN we prove it?
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Michael Bolton 15h
OK. So please let me ask: can we prove, in a scientific sense, the hypothesis that a product is of acceptable quality?
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Michael Bolton 15h
OK; can you give me an example of a hypothesis around opportunity to increase value, and the motivation for the experiment?
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Michael Bolton 15h
I mean scientific proof, not mathematical proof.
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Michael Bolton 15h
Can you prove quality? That is, can you run an experiment to show that there are no problems in a product?
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Michael Bolton 16h
Replying to @orlandohenri1 @mbsings
You're thinking of .
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Michael Bolton 23h
I'm motivated to help people provide value, quality, progress, culture, safety. Unless we look actively for threats to those, unless we explore risk and attempt to expose problems, how do we come to a *justified* belief that we have helped to prevent such problems?
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