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Mary Hui
There is usually never a line at the train ticketing machines. Judging from an overheard convo, it appears that people are reluctant to use their rechargeable Octopus cards for fear of leaving a paper trail of them having been present at the protest.
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Mary Hui Jun 11
Replying to @maryhui
"We're afraid of having our data tracked," one female protester told me. She said that this ticket-buying was't as prevalent during the 2014 Umbrella Movement. Five years on, however, people are more wary & aware.
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Mary Hui Jun 11
Replying to @maryhui
This raises a lot of interesting questions about cash vs. cashless societies, and how in times of protest people may drastically adjust their usual economic behaviour.
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Bob Clark Jun 11
Replying to @maryhui
Makes sense. Great reporting, Mary, on the protests. Thank you.
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Mary Hui Jun 11
Replying to @badgercrack
Thanks for following along. Thanks for the support.
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Mary Hui Jun 11
Replying to @maryhui
For additional context, since this photo doesn't show the whole scene: the line at every ticket machine stretched back 10+ meters.
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Jenny in Woods Jun 11
Replying to @maryhui
No, this is for the street block, to block the traffic. This is also going on on the ground, block the roads so legislative council was forced to delay today. Please clarify this.
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Mary Hui Jun 11
Replying to @Jenny_in_Woods
I can see that that could also be true. But per what I heard from protesters, it was also a precautionary measure as described above.
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Mary Hui Jun 12
Replying to @maryhui
Using data from cashless, prepaid Octopus cards to track down suspects is not new. As early as 2010, HK police used such data to trace a murder suspect, as seen in this China Daily story
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Mary Hui Jun 13
Replying to @maryhui
In this mentioned case above, it was not murder, but an acid attack.
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Mary Hui Jun 13
Replying to @maryhui
And tracking data on metro/transit cards is not just done in Hong Kong or China. Way back in 2001, US authorities used MetroCard data to trace, arrest, and indict a murder suspect.
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Mary Hui Jun 13
Replying to @maryhui
Prosecutors said this marked the first murder case where a MetroCard was key evidence, according to this New York Post story \
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Mary Hui Jun 13
Replying to @maryhui
Here is the full write-up:
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