Twitter | Search | |
Mark Dalgleish Jul 9
Replying to @markdalgleish
If you love the cascade so much, why limit it to CSS? That's actually a serious question.
Reply Retweet Like
Andres Calabrese Jul 9
Replying to @markdalgleish
Cascading properties and methods a.k.a. class inheritance 🤔
Reply Retweet Like
Mark Dalgleish Jul 9
Replying to @AndresCalabrese
Oh no. Definitely not that.
Reply Retweet Like
Kent C. Dodds Jul 9
Replying to @markdalgleish
Sorry Mark, this one's not quite true enough to get a retweet, but I did chuckle so there's that 😄
Reply Retweet Like
Mark Dalgleish Jul 9
Replying to @kentcdodds
This is actually a serious meme though.
Reply Retweet Like
Kent C. Dodds Jul 9
Replying to @markdalgleish
Hmmm.. feels pretty different to me 🤔
Reply Retweet Like
Mark Dalgleish Jul 9
Replying to @kentcdodds
Context-based components > context-based styles. You can implement the latter with the former, but not the other way around.
Reply Retweet Like
Kyle Mathews Jul 9
What does context-based components mean?
Reply Retweet Like
Mark Dalgleish Jul 9
Renders differently based on a parent context.
Reply Retweet Like
Mark Dalgleish Jul 9
As opposed to CSS, which can only affect styles (or before/after pseudos)
Reply Retweet Like
Kyle Mathews Jul 9
Hmm ok maybe still confused as it looks like you're comparing css-in-js to something. But this is CSS context based styling vs react context based rendering (including css-in-js)?
Reply Retweet Like
Ben Adam Jul 9
Replying to @markdalgleish @_gingur
😂 its you bro
Reply Retweet Like
George Jul 9
Replying to @markdalgleish
I love this meme. Drives the point straight to the hypocrisy of hype driven CSS.
Reply Retweet Like
Nabil Tharwat Jul 10
Replying to @markdalgleish
Well, is rendering a fallback in case of an error considered part of that? 😆
Reply Retweet Like
Marais Rossouw Jul 10
Replying to @markdalgleish
That's more or less what relay does right? You fragment on an edge, and it'll give you different data depending on what ancestor it's given.
Reply Retweet Like