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Mark Dalgleish
🦄 CSS Modules co-creator, Playroom, Braid, . ECMAScript addict, computational designer, dad x4 ☕ OSS / UI / design / tooling at 🍦🇦🇺✌🏻✝️
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Mark Dalgleish 11h
Replying to @johmsalas
This is more akin to CSS custom properties rather than old school CSS. But even then, this is more powerful because it can affect more than just styling.
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Mark Dalgleish 13h
Replying to @markdalgleish
We've been doing this in Braid for a while now—the difference is that we did it inconsistently (some states were only available via context and had no opt-out), and we didn't give it a name.
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Mark Dalgleish 13h
Replying to @markdalgleish
You can implement this internally in any number of ways—this is more of a component API design pattern. For example, you might just map this to CSS variables. Or, you might use React Context. Either way, your consumers should interact with it in the same manner.
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Mark Dalgleish 13h
Starting to land on a pattern for design system components of "contextual defaults." The idea is to use context to infer sensible defaults for props, while allowing for explicit prop overrides.
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Mark Dalgleish 14h
Replying to @markdalgleish
The numbers and alpha characters are literal text nodes that have `user-select: none` and `aria-hidden`.
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Mark Dalgleish 14h
Replying to @markdalgleish
To be clear, I've reset the default browser styles and I'm manually reconstructing them so they follow our system's layout rules. Trying to get the browser's list styles to behave predictably is a lost cause.
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Mark Dalgleish Aug 4
Replying to @markdalgleish
A snippet of CSS to give you an idea: margin-right: -0.4ch;
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Mark Dalgleish Aug 4
Current rabbit hole: Trying to get lists of various types (bullet, numeric, alpha) to line up vertically and look visually balanced against each other. Way harder than it looks.
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Mark Dalgleish Aug 3
Replying to @joshwnj
This looks really interesting! Feel like I've needed something like this. Thanks for sharing.
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Mark Dalgleish Aug 3
Replying to @chriseppstein
Fair point.
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Mark Dalgleish Aug 3
Replying to @JeeZeh
There's value in what you're describing—hearing someone elucidate your own thoughts—but to me, that's not what a list of principles is for.
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Mark Dalgleish Aug 3
Replying to @markdalgleish
This is why I like the Bible, by the way.
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Mark Dalgleish Aug 3
Replying to @markdalgleish
IMO a list of principles should aim to make the reader realise they're falling short. If everyone's just nodding along, it's not helping.
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Mark Dalgleish Aug 3
If a list of design principles is entirely uncontroversial, in the sense that I can't imagine anyone legitimately arguing with them, I struggle to see how they provide any value.
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Mark Dalgleish Aug 2
Replying to @buildsghost
Makes me think surveys and interviews are more like health metrics rather than something you intend to change dramatically since it can be very slow moving—hard to assign cause and effect.
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Mark Dalgleish Aug 2
Replying to @buildsghost
Thanks for the heads up, this is super useful to hear.
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Mark Dalgleish Aug 2
Replying to @joebell_
Developers understand the parallels with "DevOps" but I imagine most designers don't get the reference.
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Mark Dalgleish Aug 2
Replying to @joebell_
Feels like "DesignOps" either got co-opted, or I completely misread the term.
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Mark Dalgleish Aug 2
Replying to @buildsghost
Sorry, not quite sure what you mean. Sounds interesting though. Could you elaborate a bit?
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Mark Dalgleish Aug 2
Design systems are a subset of this problem space.
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