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Margot Wood @ SDCC
Starting a new thread here on YA book marketing for those interested.
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Margot Wood @ SDCC Mar 23
Replying to @margotwood
At HC I was on a task force that spent over a year analyzing what made YA books popular. We were trying to find that pocket of gold but only found veins. I wish I had shared our findings publicly bc the information was valuable but ultimately the higher ups didn't even listen.
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Margot Wood @ SDCC Mar 23
Replying to @margotwood
Take with a grain of salt bc the market is a living organism, but in the study we discovered that YA authors with successful SERIES had a harder time breaking out after that initial series that brought them success. Bc readers were fans of the SERIES not necessarily the AUTHOR.
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Margot Wood @ SDCC Mar 23
Replying to @margotwood
And authors who wrote standalones we're able to cultivate steadier sales over a longer period of time bc readers were fans of them as writers, BUT success (strong sales) often took longer to achieve than those who wrote series.
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Margot Wood @ SDCC Mar 23
Replying to @margotwood
So if you are a debut author launching a series, consider marketing YOU as the author while also promoting the SERIES. And for standalone writers, make sure all your books are at least BRANDED. They are diff stories but when shelved together, should look unified in a way.
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Margot Wood @ SDCC Mar 23
Replying to @margotwood
Another HUGE piece of information we learned was that the most important time to be marketing a book was 8 weeks (specifically that length) AFTER a book's on sale date.
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Margot Wood @ SDCC Mar 23
Replying to @margotwood
This is vastly different from what the big 5 publishers do. 90% of their marketing is before on sale - to get the buyers to stock your book. But there's still an emphasis on trying to get readers to pre-order which isn't how readers shop anymore. Hasn't been for years.
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Margot Wood @ SDCC Mar 23
Replying to @margotwood
Ppl don't pre-order anymore. We want to be able to read the book we are excited about RIGHT AWAY. So, if you are looking to spend your own $ on marketing, spend it in the first few weeks after your on sale date. Pre-release = sell-in Post-release = sell-through
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Margot Wood @ SDCC Mar 23
Replying to @margotwood
Obviously people need to know about your book before it's release so hype it up as much as you can but don't end your marketing the day it goes on sale.
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Margot Wood @ SDCC Mar 23
Replying to @margotwood
But you have to have both: your book in the stores and then the excitement from the readers. You can get the readers all hyped up for your book but if it isn't available in stores or has a low print run then you're screwed.
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Margot Wood @ SDCC Mar 23
Replying to @margotwood
And on the flip side if you don't have reader hype but lots of bookstore buyers are hyped then you are looking at massive returns in 6 months. So, you have to market to both the buyers and the readers and time it well!
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Margot Wood @ SDCC Mar 23
Replying to @margotwood
Sorry for all the typos in this thread. Hopefully some of this info is helpful to you!
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Margot Wood @ SDCC Mar 23
Replying to @margotwood
Gotta end this here, my dog just killed a squirrel in my back yard and I gotta go take care of that, but my DMs are open if you have questions! 😊
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Amy Nichols Mar 23
I pre-order! I love that with Prime I get release day delivery!! No lines! No wait! And fun mail!!
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❤️ Debbie ❤️ Mar 23
I would pre-order but book stores don’t seem to list stuff before they are released. I only hear about upcoming titles in blogger circles and if I’m requesting ARCs. 🤷🏻‍♀️ I don’t even think book stores in my area have pre-order options.
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Margot Wood @ SDCC Mar 23
A lot of them don't because of the e-commerce platforms they are using don't allow for pre-orders. (Like Shopify, the only way to do pre-orders properly is if you pay for an app).
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Margot Wood @ SDCC Mar 23
That's awesome! And I do too sometimes, but the reality is, most of the time I'll hear about a book, add it to my Goodreads shelf and then forget about it until I see it in stores.
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Peter Ginna Mar 23
Replying to @margotwood
Margot, thanks for this very interesting thread. A few years ago (5?) I remember hearing from a reliable source that Amazon said 25% of a book's sales were preorders--an argument for NOT waiting until post-pub for marketing. Is that no longer the case?
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Margot Wood @ SDCC Mar 23
Replying to @DoctorSyntax
That's only 25% of sales. So that fits my "you need both pre and post marketing" finding. You need to do some leading up for sure, but I'd argue that you could let your pub do the up front stuff and then you pick up where they leave off.
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Margot Wood @ SDCC Mar 23
Replying to @margotwood
Update on the squirrel: it did not die! Just played dead. It has been safely escorted off the premises. 🐿️🐿️ Thanks for all your comments on this thread!
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