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Margot Wood
Starting a new thread here on YA book marketing for those interested.
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Margot Wood 23 Mar 19
Replying to @margotwood
At HC I was on a task force that spent over a year analyzing what made YA books popular. We were trying to find that pocket of gold but only found veins. I wish I had shared our findings publicly bc the information was valuable but ultimately the higher ups didn't even listen.
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Margot Wood 23 Mar 19
Replying to @margotwood
Take with a grain of salt bc the market is a living organism, but in the study we discovered that YA authors with successful SERIES had a harder time breaking out after that initial series that brought them success. Bc readers were fans of the SERIES not necessarily the AUTHOR.
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Margot Wood 23 Mar 19
Replying to @margotwood
And authors who wrote standalones we're able to cultivate steadier sales over a longer period of time bc readers were fans of them as writers, BUT success (strong sales) often took longer to achieve than those who wrote series.
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Margot Wood 23 Mar 19
Replying to @margotwood
So if you are a debut author launching a series, consider marketing YOU as the author while also promoting the SERIES. And for standalone writers, make sure all your books are at least BRANDED. They are diff stories but when shelved together, should look unified in a way.
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Margot Wood 23 Mar 19
Replying to @margotwood
Another HUGE piece of information we learned was that the most important time to be marketing a book was 8 weeks (specifically that length) AFTER a book's on sale date.
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Margot Wood 23 Mar 19
Replying to @margotwood
This is vastly different from what the big 5 publishers do. 90% of their marketing is before on sale - to get the buyers to stock your book. But there's still an emphasis on trying to get readers to pre-order which isn't how readers shop anymore. Hasn't been for years.
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Margot Wood 23 Mar 19
Replying to @margotwood
Ppl don't pre-order anymore. We want to be able to read the book we are excited about RIGHT AWAY. So, if you are looking to spend your own $ on marketing, spend it in the first few weeks after your on sale date. Pre-release = sell-in Post-release = sell-through
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Margot Wood 23 Mar 19
Replying to @margotwood
Obviously people need to know about your book before it's release so hype it up as much as you can but don't end your marketing the day it goes on sale.
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Margot Wood 23 Mar 19
Replying to @margotwood
But you have to have both: your book in the stores and then the excitement from the readers. You can get the readers all hyped up for your book but if it isn't available in stores or has a low print run then you're screwed.
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Margot Wood 23 Mar 19
Replying to @margotwood
And on the flip side if you don't have reader hype but lots of bookstore buyers are hyped then you are looking at massive returns in 6 months. So, you have to market to both the buyers and the readers and time it well!
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Margot Wood 23 Mar 19
Replying to @margotwood
Sorry for all the typos in this thread. Hopefully some of this info is helpful to you!
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Margot Wood 23 Mar 19
Replying to @margotwood
Gotta end this here, my dog just killed a squirrel in my back yard and I gotta go take care of that, but my DMs are open if you have questions! 😊
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Margot Wood 23 Mar 19
Replying to @margotwood
Update on the squirrel: it did not die! Just played dead. It has been safely escorted off the premises. 🐿️🐿️ Thanks for all your comments on this thread!
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Margot Wood 23 Mar 19
Replying to @margotwood
Here's a link to another book marketing thread on working with influencers for those interested!
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Margot Wood 23 Mar 19
Replying to @margotwood
And here is another thread I did for debut authors (of any age or genre) on social media and how to build your platform:
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