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Marco Arment May 13
I’m no lawyer, but two things have been obvious to me: - Customers absolutely buy apps from Apple, not developers. - Apple’s requirement that all in-app transactions go through their system (which takes 30%) is anticompetitive, and should absolutely be challenged by regulators.
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Marco Arment
Add this to the pile of significant legal anticompetitive challenges that Apple faces by their in-app purchase rules. They’ll never allow sideloading or reduce the 30%, but I expect all of this to result in a relaxing of the “can’t even mention other payment methods” rule.
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Michael Love May 13
Replying to @marcoarment
Could be forced to do a lot more, c.f. Microsoft having to un-bundle IE; Apple could be compelled to not only allow other app stores but actually provide a startup alert to invite you to pick an alternate one.
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Shameer Mulji May 13
Replying to @elkmovie @marcoarment
Bloomberg's most recent rumor has Apple implementing a download manager for Safari. I wonder if Apple can implement GateKeeper for iOS and allow 3rd party app installs via safari?
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Michael Love May 13
Replying to @shameermulji
I don't expect it'd be a big technical lift, I just don't know if they'd be willing to give up that much control. They're going to have to give up something but that might not be the thing they want to give up.
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Felipe Fermin May 13
Replying to @marcoarment
Well, Apple may now have a solution for this whole monopoly conundrum: PWA (Progressive Web Apps). They can be accessed outside the App Store (vía the browser), downloaded into the iPhone and Devs can charge for it. iOS 12.2+ have better support for PWAs now.
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Chase Giles May 13
My customers personally don't notice too big of a difference between native and PWAs, assuming casual users.
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👻 2° climate change target 👻 May 13
Replying to @marcoarment
I would be fine with being allowed to buy books and audiobooks in the Amazon App on iOS This going through Safari is the dumbest thing ever
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Stephen Fleming May 13
Replying to @marcoarment
It’d be nice if the Audible app could bring back the button to “buy this book in your web browser”…
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Mattan Ingram May 13
Replying to @marcoarment
Does anyone else find this less personally egregious compared to Apple not letting me control Spotify with Siri while I drive? I know legally it's not the same, but I'll happily pay an extra buck for an app if Apple would make driving safer and stop keeping Siri in a jail cell.
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David Comay May 13
Replying to @marcoarment
Marco, I’m confused though - other than subscription services like Netflix, Spotify, HBO, etc which would benefit from the “mentioning of other payment methods”, who else would benefit from it? I must be missing something when it comes to pay-once apps.
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Avi Frisch May 14
Replying to @marcoarment
Apple was claiming a technical exemption based on whether they were a direct seller, which they obviously are. Whether they are a monopoly here isn't so obvious.
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DMX May 13
Replying to @marcoarment
what is anti-competitive? Should Apple be asked to share their source code, the hardware design, etc? All these are nonsense and cheap talk.
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Steve Nagel #voteblue💙nomatterwho May 13
Replying to @marcoarment
People won’t pay diddly for naked electrons. So Apple built the best atomic package for electrons on earth—the iPhone. Then it secured the credit cards of the best billion customers anywhere. Now you want to pay Apple 30% ofna $1 app and sell $100s of in-app stuff? Hmm.
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SA May 14
Replying to @marcoarment
Every store in America does this. Walk into Publix and find them charging less for their product next to a competitor’s product on the same shelf. All Apple is doing is charging people to sell in their store. Who wants to buy uncontrolled apps?
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Nas May 13
Replying to @marcoarment
I think they could be forced to allow sideloading. The fact that we can only get iPhone apps from one source is why they are seen as a monopoly.
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