Twitter | Search | |
♂=♀ ❌ Jun 5
Replying to @RantingF @Toxic_Fem
This was entirely because of married women being supported by their husbands. By 1887, 3/4 of female workers in German cities were under 25 years old. 96 % of them were single. (15)
Reply Retweet Like
♂=♀ ❌ Jun 5
Replying to @RantingF @Toxic_Fem
By 1911 only 25% of British women worked. By 1939 only 10% of married American women worked. (16)
Reply Retweet Like
♂=♀ ❌ Jun 5
Replying to @RantingF @Toxic_Fem
This is a good overview of the late Victorian era, still more women being 'allowed' to work outside the home than feminists claim, but far fewer than pre-industrialisation. (17)
Reply Retweet Like
♂=♀ ❌ Jun 5
Replying to @RantingF @Toxic_Fem
This change from close to the vast majority of women working (pre 1850s) to a small percentage (by 1930s) was overwhelmingly welcomed by women, and universally seen as a benefit to women. (18)
Reply Retweet Like
♂=♀ ❌ Jun 5
Replying to @RantingF @Toxic_Fem
John Stuart Mill, thought that “it is not... a desirable custom that the wife should contribute by her labor to the income of the family.” - Mill, The Subjection of Women, p. 47. (19)
Reply Retweet Like
♂=♀ ❌ Jun 5
Replying to @RantingF @Toxic_Fem
The German Government stated in 1940: "the goal remains to ensure that, in 20 years' time, no woman is obliged to work in a factory." [Winkler, Frauenarbeit im Dritten Reich, pp. 110-9.] (20)
Reply Retweet Like
♂=♀ ❌ Jun 5
Replying to @RantingF @Toxic_Fem
In the Soviet Union, when mothers got permission to work part time instead of full time, and fathers still had to work full-time, this was welcomed as "liberating" by women's groups. (21)
Reply Retweet Like
♂=♀ ❌ Jun 5
Replying to @RantingF @Toxic_Fem
Even as late as 1915 Clementina Black was bemoaning the fact that so many women had to work to keep a roof over their heads, supporting their husbands in bringing home the bacon. (22)
Reply Retweet Like
♂=♀ ❌ Jun 5
Replying to @RantingF @Toxic_Fem
During WWII, when many women had to do war work in factories, it was found that women had been "made miserable by the [war work]" and "fervently wished themselves back into their prewar home routine." (23)
Reply Retweet Like
♂=♀ ❌ Jun 5
Replying to @RantingF @Toxic_Fem
During WWII the British and US governments spent a fortune on propaganda encouraging women to work, but less than 40% of women of working age in both countries took it up. Men were not given the choice. (24)
Reply Retweet Like
♂=♀ ❌
Myth 4: Historically men were not forced to work outside the home (usually phrased as "men were allowed to") The way this is implemented is by forcing men to support women, and take sole responsibility to support children. For most men this means having to work. (25)
Reply Retweet Like More
♂=♀ ❌ Jun 5
Replying to @RantingF @Toxic_Fem
As early as 92BC men were forced to support their wives by law. [Marylin Arthur, "'Liberated' Women: The Classical Era," in Bridenthal and Koonz, eds., Becoming Visible, p. 75.] (26)
Reply Retweet Like
♂=♀ ❌ Jun 5
Replying to @RantingF @Toxic_Fem
Men who refused to support their wives were legally punished under Roman law. [Grubbs, Law and Family in Late Antiquity, p. 146.] (27)
Reply Retweet Like
♂=♀ ❌ Jun 5
Replying to @RantingF @Toxic_Fem
Vedic law and traditional Islamic law also say a man must support his wife. (28)
Reply Retweet Like
♂=♀ ❌ Jun 5
Replying to @RantingF @Toxic_Fem
In English common law, men must support their wives. This was reinforced in successive acts of parliament in 1861, 1881, 1920 and 1964. In practice nowadays it is enforced by the woman divorcing and claiming support. [Gillis, For Better, for Worse, p. 199]
Reply Retweet Like
♂=♀ ❌ Jun 5
Replying to @RantingF @Toxic_Fem
In the 19th Century women could sue their husbands for maintenance while still married, and if she won the man could be imprisoned. (31) [Gillis, For Better, for Worse, pp. 209, 251]
Reply Retweet Like
♂=♀ ❌ Jun 5
Replying to @RantingF @Toxic_Fem
After 1880 in Britain laws were passed absolving women of liability for their husbands’ debts. But husbands’ liability for their wives’ debts were universal and absolute. Men could, and were, imprisoned for not paying their wives debts. (32)
Reply Retweet Like
♂=♀ ❌ Jun 5
Replying to @RantingF @Toxic_Fem
This also applied after divorce; in Victorian England and the USA a divorced woman had the right to be maintained "at the level to which she had been accustomed." And similarly elsewhere. (33)
Reply Retweet Like
♂=♀ ❌ Jun 5
Replying to @RantingF @Toxic_Fem
As late as 1979, the United States Supreme Court had to strike down an Alabama law that denied alimony to a person simply because he was male [Leo Kanowitz, "'Benign' Sex Discrimination: Its Troubles and Their Cure," Hastings Law Journal, 31, 6, July 1980, p. 1386-7] (34)
Reply Retweet Like
♂=♀ ❌ Jun 5
Replying to @RantingF @Toxic_Fem
The result of this is that men spend nearly twice as much of their total time working than women - 66% vs 34%. (35) [United Nations Development Program, Human Development Report, 1995, table 4.2.]
Reply Retweet Like