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greenpill 5 Jun 18
Replying to @RantingF @Toxic_fem
This was entirely because of married women being supported by their husbands. By 1887, 3/4 of female workers in German cities were under 25 years old. 96 % of them were single. (15)
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greenpill 5 Jun 18
Replying to @RantingF @Toxic_fem
By 1911 only 25% of British women worked. By 1939 only 10% of married American women worked. (16)
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greenpill 5 Jun 18
Replying to @RantingF @Toxic_fem
This is a good overview of the late Victorian era, still more women being 'allowed' to work outside the home than feminists claim, but far fewer than pre-industrialisation. (17)
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greenpill 5 Jun 18
Replying to @RantingF @Toxic_fem
This change from close to the vast majority of women working (pre 1850s) to a small percentage (by 1930s) was overwhelmingly welcomed by women, and universally seen as a benefit to women. (18)
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greenpill 5 Jun 18
Replying to @RantingF @Toxic_fem
John Stuart Mill, thought that “it is not... a desirable custom that the wife should contribute by her labor to the income of the family.” - Mill, The Subjection of Women, p. 47. (19)
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greenpill 5 Jun 18
Replying to @RantingF @Toxic_fem
The German Government stated in 1940: "the goal remains to ensure that, in 20 years' time, no woman is obliged to work in a factory." [Winkler, Frauenarbeit im Dritten Reich, pp. 110-9.] (20)
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greenpill 5 Jun 18
Replying to @RantingF @Toxic_fem
In the Soviet Union, when mothers got permission to work part time instead of full time, and fathers still had to work full-time, this was welcomed as "liberating" by women's groups. (21)
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greenpill 5 Jun 18
Replying to @RantingF @Toxic_fem
Even as late as 1915 Clementina Black was bemoaning the fact that so many women had to work to keep a roof over their heads, supporting their husbands in bringing home the bacon. (22)
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greenpill 5 Jun 18
Replying to @RantingF @Toxic_fem
During WWII, when many women had to do war work in factories, it was found that women had been "made miserable by the [war work]" and "fervently wished themselves back into their prewar home routine." (23)
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greenpill 5 Jun 18
Replying to @RantingF @Toxic_fem
During WWII the British and US governments spent a fortune on propaganda encouraging women to work, but less than 40% of women of working age in both countries took it up. Men were not given the choice. (24)
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greenpill
Myth 4: Historically men were not forced to work outside the home (usually phrased as "men were allowed to") The way this is implemented is by forcing men to support women, and take sole responsibility to support children. For most men this means having to work. (25)
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greenpill 5 Jun 18
Replying to @RantingF @Toxic_fem
As early as 92BC men were forced to support their wives by law. [Marylin Arthur, "'Liberated' Women: The Classical Era," in Bridenthal and Koonz, eds., Becoming Visible, p. 75.] (26)
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greenpill 5 Jun 18
Replying to @RantingF @Toxic_fem
Men who refused to support their wives were legally punished under Roman law. [Grubbs, Law and Family in Late Antiquity, p. 146.] (27)
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