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Belinda Barnet
23,000 giant fruit bats — about a third of the species — dropped dead from heat stress in Queensland and New South Wales in April. 10,000 black flying foxes, a different species, also died. Bodies plopped into backyard gardens and swimming pools.
Tasmanian Aboriginals faced genocide, and now extreme climate change is threatening what’s left of their culture.
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Leeanne Dec 29
Replying to @manjusrii @ItsBouquet
As an Australian, I learnt more from this article than any available in Australia. Mortifying. Is it my fault or our news agencies?
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Belinda Barnet Dec 29
Replying to @55leeanne @ItsBouquet
Murdoch.
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Iggy🇱🇰 Dec 29
Replying to @manjusrii
We are heading towards an irreversible environmental catastrophe & our Politicians must stop talking about climate change issues as something that we still need to ”debate,” analyze and argue about.
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💧🐨🔥 𝕲𝖗𝖊𝖊𝖓𝕵𝖎𝖎𝖓 [retired union thug] Dec 29
Replying to @manjusrii @ItsBouquet
This is sounding like an ‘extinction event’
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💧 🌊Fillistine Rodent Dec 29
Replying to @manjusrii @pharnzwurth
We hear more from OS reporting than in our own country!🤬🤬🤬
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CarolineMaybe Dec 29
Al-Jazeera, CNN and Bloomberg today. It’s never for something good when Oz is mentioned.
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🍌Noisy Australian Comrade 🍍 Dec 29
Replying to @manjusrii @ipatch169
and about 30,000 Spectacled Flying foxes in - bats are pollinators
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TruthSeeker Dec 29
Replying to @manjusrii @delpjm
As you know, the loss of bats anywhere has profoud consequences for the environment. Many species of native trees depend upon them for pollination and seed dispersal.
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💧David Gray Dec 29
Replying to @manjusrii
It's all very alarming, and I hate knowing that we were warned ☹
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💧Dean Barron Dec 29
Replying to @DaveyDogs @manjusrii
That's why the "they" get so angry with us.
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