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Mandi Eatough
Ali Stroker’s win marks the first time a wheelchair user has won a Tony Award (she was also the first wheelchair user on Broadway & the first nominated for a Tony). Tonight there was no ramp for her to get to the stage to accept her award. [Thread]
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Mandi Eatough Jun 9
Replying to @ALISTROKER
has discussed before how she’s worked to deal with inaccessibility in the theatres she’s performed in. Sometimes this means retrofitting backstage & general spaces with ramps and other times it means needing help to get through what are largely inaccessible spaces.
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Mandi Eatough Jun 9
Replying to @mandieatough
Her speech tonight focused on the importance of disability representation in theatre. She’s right that disabled kids can see themselves represented on Broadway more than ever before, but there is still a clear lack of knowledge or priority towards accessibility in the industry.
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Mandi Eatough Jun 9
Replying to @mandieatough
Not making sure that Ali had a way to be with the audience & go from there to the stage to accept her award (as everyone else gets to do) is at best an unfortunate oversight. This sends a message about how much the industry actually prioritizes accessibility. Do better Broadway.
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JNo5204🎵🇺🇸 Jun 9
Replying to @mandieatough
I am very glad she won. She was a dynamo in her performance.
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Helen Armstrong Jun 9
Replying to @JNo5204 @mandieatough
YES - that song she sang at the awards - my God what a voice !
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Alice Wong Jun 10
Replying to @mandieatough
Thank you for this thread!
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claudiaalick Jun 10
Replying to @mandieatough
need to hire a disabled producer and access designer.
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Renee Grassi Jun 10
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Lindsey Jun 10
Sorry, if you have someone with an out-of-norm need NOMINATED, you should probably have a clear plan for what happens when they win. That gives just as much respect and dignity to them as to the other winners.
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Emily Winderman Jun 10
Yeah, they knew she was the winner when they set up that day, right?!
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katie k ✨ Jun 10
Replying to @mandieatough
It was my understanding she was still backstage from the performance? Is that not right?
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Mandi Eatough Jun 10
Replying to @mandieatough
Reminder to avoid using ableist phrases/words to talk about the absurdity of this situation (and more generally). Part of advocating for accessible spaces is avoiding ableist language, ESPECIALLY when you’re talking about accessibility & ableism.
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daisy17 Jun 10
Replying to @mandieatough
I was wondering about this (as I watched)
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Nicholas Bianchi Jun 10
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Eryn 🍞🏳️‍🌈 Jun 11
I think you misinterpreted. is saying that they should have prepared for the POSSIBILITY of her winning.
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Lindsey Jun 11
I don’t think she did misinterpret. I‘m certain the event planners knew who the winners were before the actual event with enough time to have a plan in place. Even if it was the day of, it’s not that much work to build a ramp. But yes, even just the possibility.
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