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Lydia Assouad Oct 19
Thread: Lebanon's protests can largely be explained by the extremely high levels of inequality in the country. Key facts about inequality in Lebanon based on recent research by the World Inequality Lab ():
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Lydia Assouad Oct 19
Replying to @WIL_inequality
1. The top 1% richest adults receives approximately a quarter of the total national income, placing Lebanon among the most unequal countries in the World
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Lydia Assouad Oct 19
Replying to @WIL_inequality
2. Meanwhile, the bottom 50% of the population is left with 10% of total national income.
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Lydia Assouad Oct 19
Replying to @WIL_inequality
3. Lebanon is characterized by a dual social structure, with an extremely rich group at the top, whose income levels are comparable to their counterparts in high-income countries, and a much poorer mass of the population, as in many developing countries
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Lydia Assouad Oct 19
Replying to @WIL_inequality
4. This polarized structure reflects the absence of a broad “middle class”: While the middle 40% receives more than the share accruing to the top 10% in W. Europe, and a bit less in the US, it is left with far less income than the top 10% in Lebanon (between 20-30 p.p less)
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Lydia Assouad Oct 19
Replying to @WIL_inequality
5. The richest captured most of the income growth since 2005 : The top 10% saw its income increase by 5 to 15%, while the bottom 50% saw it decrease by 15% and the poorest 10% by a quarter.
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Lydia Assouad
6. Quid of wealth inequality ? If we look at Lebanese billionaires' wealth—the only source available for the country — they seem to do quite well (average between 2005-2016):
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Lydia Assouad Oct 19
Replying to @WIL_inequality
Their wealth represented on average 20 % of national income between 2005 and 2016, as opposed to 2% in China, 5% in France, and 10% in the US. Given how wealth is concentrated in these countries, this suggests that wealth inequality is probably extreme in Lebanon
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Lydia Assouad Oct 19
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