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Literary Review
Britain's best-loved literary magazine. Lively, independent-minded reviews of new books every month. Get our free newsletter:
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Literary Review 11h
Thirty-two years ago this month, we published Muriel Spark's short story, 'A Playhouse Called Remarkable' Read it here:
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Literary Review Jun 19
Time travel, bicycles and white horses populate 's roundup of children's books by , , , , , and more.
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Edwin Thomas Jun 18
Joanna Kavenna’s ‘Cooking with Trotsky’s Frying Pan’ in June’s is the most well written and interesting one page article I’ve read in a long time. I’ll be picking up Zed based on the strength of her style from these some 1000 words alone.
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Literary Review Jun 18
'There is at present a disconnect between what the general public hears about the Enlightenment and what is said in academic circles' aims to set the record straight in her review of Margaret C Jacob's 'The Secular Enlightenment'
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Literary Review Jun 17
'It certainly made me think more deeply about landownership, even if I believe that what really matters is the way we use the land, rather than the names on the title deeds' on 's new book, 'Who Owns England?'
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Literary Review Jun 16
reviews new thrillers by Thomas Harris, Ben Elton, , , , Oliver Harris, , and .
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Literary Review Jun 16
reviews new thrillers by Thomas Harris, Ben Elton, , , , Oliver Harris, , and .
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Literary Review Jun 15
'Throughout his life Pliny himself remained recognisably the same person who, as a teenager, had opted to keep his nose in his books rather than head towards an erupting volcano' reviews 's new biography of Pliny.
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Literary Review Jun 14
The 2019 Hubert Butler Essay Prize, sponsored by , is now open. This year's subject: 'Where does a citizen of the world belong?' First prize: £1,000. Closing date: 2 Sept 2019. Details at .
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Lesley Downer Jun 14
My review of Kawabata Yasunari's marvelous and mysterious 'Dandelions' for .
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Literary Review Jun 14
In June's Silenced Voices, writes about Ayşe Düzkan, the writer and feminist activist who is currently behind bars in Turkey.
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Literary Review Jun 13
'Chanel, who in Paris lived in a suite at the Ritz, was almost unique in establishing herself as both a successful entrepreneur and a distinguished figure in high society.' Selina Hastings explores the haute société of the Côte d’Azur.
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Literary Review Jun 12
'A nuanced examination of the politics of power in sexual relationships, and a novel that refuses to offer easy answers' on Veronica Raimo's 'The Girl at the Door'
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Literary Review Jun 11
In this month's diary, Joanna Kavenna muses on Orhan Pamuk's Istanbul, alternate realities and Trotskyite eggs.
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Literary Review Jun 10
'In 2013 a filmmaker managed to get onto the island (it isn’t easy) and saw coffins emerging from the ooze and human bones scattered all along the shore.' Christopher Hart on 's stories of the Thames estuary.
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Literary Review Jun 9
'In an era of fake news and alternative facts, of populisms that come in varying shades of left, right and green, Orwell’s message remains relevant' 's book on Orwell is 'a magnificent piece of work', says
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Literary Review Jun 8
'He has never flown or swum; he seldom leaves his home state of Victoria and has never travelled outside Australia; he has no sense of smell; he dislikes cinemas, libraries, art galleries and theatres' on the eccentric Gerald Murnane.
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Edinburgh Book Fest Jun 6
The 2019 programme has launched! 🤩 and we want YOU to help us create them from 10–26 August. With over 900 authors representing more countries than ever before, there are events for all ages and all interests.
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Literary Review Jun 7
'Living day by day, wandering here and there across the hills, none of them had any sense at the time that something extraordinary was happening' Nicholas Roe wanders through the Quantocks with Wordsworth and Coleridge. Image © Tom Hammick/Bridgeman
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Literary Review Jun 6
Schizophrenia 'would turn out to be "the bloody battleground upon which the fiercest ideological disputes about madness and its meanings are fought"'. navigates the 'heartland of psychiatry' in his review of 's new book.
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