Twitter | Search | |
Lina Khan
I research and write on antitrust law and competition policy.
3,857
Tweets
1,267
Following
18,551
Followers
Tweets
Lina Khan retweeted
Bloomberg Jun 14
As antitrust fight heats up, this congressman’s tech inquiry is key
Reply Retweet Like
Lina Khan 6h
This reminds me of a line from 's keynote at the Law & Inequality conference back in 2015: "My goal is that we see each merger the way the Tudors saw marriages—not so much about romance (or in this case commerce), but power."
Reply Retweet Like
Lina Khan retweeted
Tommaso Valletti Jun 14
Little THREAD on academic research in economics and GAFAs. Last night I asked myself: how much EMPIRICAL research has been published in ECONOMICS using data from GAFAs? The answer is: almost NONE.
Reply Retweet Like
Lina Khan 6h
I think Hal's break-down is right. Worth noting that these promote distinct ends: #1 reverses anti-competitive mergers; #2 & #3 are both aimed at non-discrimination; and #2 could be designed to serve additional goals (some traditional ones identified here )
Reply Retweet Like
Lina Khan retweeted
Rana Foroohar 13h
Big Tech is America’s new ‘railroad problem’
Reply Retweet Like
Lina Khan retweeted
David Dayen Jun 14
Replying to @openmarkets
The dominant media is chasing the tech shiny object (which of course distances the movement away from media monopolies) but there are dozens of sectors that need fixing, as understands. There's a threat to pigeonholing the movement as concerned only about tech.
Reply Retweet Like
Lina Khan retweeted
Katharina Pistor Jun 14
Thread - On how much the law can change without touching statutory law itself.
Reply Retweet Like
Lina Khan Jun 13
Replying to @linamkhan
(8) Addressing the panoply of challenges posed by dominant tech platforms requires first understanding the full set of legal tools & principles available to tackle them. Structural separations is a key one to recover.
Reply Retweet Like
Lina Khan Jun 13
Replying to @linamkhan
(7) The second major shift was the sharp retrenchment of antitrust. So the very tool that deregulation advocates had pointed to as a key check on dominant firm behavior was, in the end, severely defanged. Critically, this included the policing of & limits on vertical integration
Reply Retweet Like
Lina Khan Jun 13
Replying to @linamkhan
(6) A basic assumption underlying this shift was that strong antitrust enforcement would continue to police dominant firms. Alfred Kahn & Stephen Breyer, strong supporters of this change, both emphasized that even “deregulated” markets would be subject to vigorous antitrust
Reply Retweet Like
Lina Khan Jun 13
Replying to @linamkhan
(5) First, policymakers in the 1970s ushered in a massive shift at the level of regulatory paradigm, away from prioritizing equal access & reliability (sometimes via separations), in favor of promoting competition in previously regulated markets
Reply Retweet Like
Lina Khan Jun 13
Replying to @linamkhan
(4) Revisiting this history underscores what a pronounced gap we’re facing with regards to regulatory tools, legal principles, & policy imagination. The gap is largely the product of a two-fold shift
Reply Retweet Like
Lina Khan Jun 13
Replying to @linamkhan
(3) There are a few institutional pathways for effecting separations. AT&T break-up was an antitrust remedy. But Congress & non-antitrust regulators have also applied separations to promote a variety of democratic & institutionalist goals, as well as competition-based ones
Reply Retweet Like
Lina Khan Jun 13
Replying to @linamkhan
(2) There isn’t any single factor that triggered structural separations but policymakers generally focused on firms that served as critical networks & key infrastructure, including railroads, telecom providers, banks
Reply Retweet Like
Lina Khan Jun 13
Replying to @linamkhan
A few takeaways: (1) While current debate around platform break-ups often frame the remedy as exotic or extreme, structural separations have been a key principle of US economic regulation
Reply Retweet Like
Lina Khan Jun 13
My new article, just published , reviews the history of & policy justifications animating “structural separations,” aka rules that limit the markets in which dominant intermediaries can operate
Reply Retweet Like
Lina Khan Jun 13
Interesting back-and-forth between & Justice Stevens on how his time as counsel on the House Subcommittee on Monopoly Power (it was actually called that !) shaped his views on statutory interpretation
Reply Retweet Like
Lina Khan retweeted
Jameel Jaffer Jun 12
I'm late to this, but 's UCI commencement speech is excellent. Send it to all the new lawyers in your circle.
Reply Retweet Like
Lina Khan retweeted
LPE Blog Jun 11
Killing Antitrust Softly (through procedure): on the ways procedural hurdles block antitrust enforcement
Reply Retweet Like
Lina Khan retweeted
Rep. Pramila Jayapal Jun 11
When the FTC fails to intervene in big tech mergers, we not only increase prices for consumers, but we lessen innovation and choice. In , I asked antitrust expert what Facebook and Google's acquisitions of would-be competitors means for consumers.
Reply Retweet Like