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Kenneth Matreyek
I use DNA 🧬 to engineer 🏗 cells & study 🔬how protein sequence alterations impact disease 🏥.... at high throughput 🤖! Data 💻, virus 🦠, & Music lover 🎸.
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Kenneth Matreyek Mar 8
Replying to @kmatreyek
And last week while walking my dog on the same street, I saw a father out for a jog, followed by his teenage son riding a unicycle. I’ll miss this city if / when I move away.
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Kenneth Matreyek Mar 8
Was walking my dog and saw a random guy with latex gloves and a plastic bag, walking down the street alone, systematically picking up litter. In the Seattle rain. Gives me some hope for society.
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Kenneth Matreyek Mar 2
Out of curiosity, checked how many in my grad school cohorts stayed in academia. With an n of approx 40, 25% left right after PhD, and 60% left by 8 yrs. Perfectly valid career choices, and training should reflect this. Details here:
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Kenneth Matreyek retweeted
Alan Rubin Feb 21
Very excited to share our new platform for distributing and analyzing MAVE datasets. Visit the database at and check out the visualizations at or directly from a MaveDB page.
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Kenneth Matreyek Feb 21
Replying to @VirusWhisperer
Thanks Benhur! I really enjoyed seeing you again and meeting some of the other amazing faculty there!
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Kenneth Matreyek Feb 14
I like giving my wife gifts where I create objects that capture and represent our relationship. As part of this Valentine’s day, I used my data analysis and graphics skills to make her this poster which will forever remind us of our honeymoon in northern Italy last year.
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Kenneth Matreyek Feb 9
After a long work trip, very grateful for airport lasting past peak snowfall, light rail running smoothly, and the driver getting me near my house until his bus succumbed to the snow at 1:30am. 🙏 Thank you 🙏!
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Kenneth Matreyek Feb 7
Replying to @schraderlab
Thanks Jared! It was really a pleasure chatting with you during my visit!
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Kenneth Matreyek retweeted
Steven Pergam, MD, MPH Feb 4
Measles, measles, measles. Why are we having to spend time preparing and planning for measles? Because WA state and King County rates of vaccine have dropped over time. For those who aren't vaccinated - GET VACCINATED! - as Measles is preventable!
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Kenneth Matreyek Jan 21
Replying to @_amelie_rocks
Thanks! I’m sure there are better ways, but I loop through plot / save statements, then combine the directory of the resulting image files into a gif using “gifski”.
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Kenneth Matreyek Jan 20
Replying to @kmatreyek
Comment that inspired this here:
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Kenneth Matreyek Jan 20
Analysis of NIH funding awarded over time. Top 15 most funded research communities have consistently accounted for ~55% of total NIH funding since 1992 (even during the leaner years), though some fluctuations within this group (see gif below). Details at
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McHeyzer-Williams Jan 18
Tracking bioRxiv | Interval from bioRxiv posting to date first published elsewhere: Median 166 days, 90% within 1 yrs, Some 1 week |
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Molly Gasperini Jan 3
Our high-throughput enhancer-gene pair screen is officially published! In what we now (lovingly) refer to as "the assay formerly known as crisprQTL", we attempt at-scale validation and pairing of candidate regulatory elements with their target genes. 1/n
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Kenneth Matreyek Dec 27
Replying to @kmatreyek
Darnit, one final plot on the subject while I’m thinking about it. But most populous cities and the approx amounts of NIH funding they receive. (Plenty of) caveats and details mentioned on the site linked in the initial post.
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Kenneth Matreyek Dec 27
Replying to @FPRoth
Nope, major exclusion here is from improper city name matching between the NIH and US census data (Fixed this manually for a dozen, not doing it for the rest; giving up on more analysis as it turned into an unintended time sink :) ).
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Kenneth Matreyek Dec 26
Replying to @kmatreyek
Due to the repeated requests, pulled data from the US census and divided funding by city population. Super rough analysis (only does the city, not the area). But in short, if you live in a “college town” with a research university, your ratio is likely pretty high. Makes sense!
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Kenneth Matreyek Dec 26
Replying to @dougfowler42
Nope; I’m guessing it’s everything. The place with the least amount of money per award is the place where Keystone Symposia are based.
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Kenneth Matreyek Dec 26
Replying to @jghoggatt
Yep, that link was precisely where I got my data from. And hmm, 7th only lists 1.87B, whereas my grouped dataset says 2.65B. Looks like there must be more nearby schools in other districts (eg. Harvard college and Brandeis are in MA 5th).
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Kenneth Matreyek Dec 26
Replying to @dougfowler42
By number of grants, easy (since already in the dataset). Subsetted for > 10M b/c lots of random small places pop up otherwise (which most ppl probably won’t be as interested in). For bigger places: ...good job Seattle? By population analysis will have to wait for another day.
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