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Lori
Associate Professor of Communication Arts at University of Wisconsin-Madison. Author of Asian American Media Activism. Half-Japanese lover of spam and ramen.
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Lori Nov 8
Tons of AAPI voter activation successes! We raised money, translated ads, hit the pavement, protected voters, and elected AAPI reps in AZ, CA, CT, FL, GA, HI, IL, MI, MN, NV, NJ, NY, TX, VA, and WA.
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Lori Nov 8
That it's absolutely necessary! Stereotypes are broken in tons of totally different ways, but feminist satire is 1 important means for countering oppressive representational histories.
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Lori Nov 8
It is hilarious/sad that this article needed to be written for the millionth time, but there you go
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Lori Nov 8
Would love to keep seeing more thinking about APIs and electoral politics
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Lori Nov 8
Replying to @myrasu @NatComm
YASSSSSS
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Lori Nov 2
Replying to @TheMCSquad_dc
Thanks so much for inviting me to be part of this convo! It's been fun (if way too fast) and I loved hearing everyone's perspectives.
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Lori Nov 2
It's true, the rhetoric is always about how insignificant AAPI are, and they're often left out of data on voting altogether. So glad for researchers who are fixing this!
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Lori Nov 2
Replying to @kidolopez
And so many others!! This list could go on forever, but I have to get on to the next question.
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Lori Nov 2
AAPIs are small population, but mighty at the polls! Here’s an article by on congressional races where we can have maximum impact, like for
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Lori Nov 2
Replying to @TheMCSquad_dc
A6 It’s true that there are MANY ways WOC can engage in politics and fight intersectional oppression. Voting should always be at least one of those tools! We have to increase political representation alongside other important changes.
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Lori Nov 2
Replying to @mskristinawong
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Lori Nov 2
YES! Awesome links.
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Lori Nov 2
Replying to @TheMCSquad_dc
There sure is! As a media studies scholar, I can't help but bring social media in. :)
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Lori Nov 2
Replying to @TheMCSquad_dc
Unfortunately whenever WOC speak up they face backlash and attack, and Twitter has facilitated abuse, hate, and violence against WOC too. Tech companies need to work harder to protect vulnerable ppl online
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Lori Nov 2
Replying to @TheMCSquad_dc
Private/smaller conversations on social media (like in FB groups, or on Tumblr) allow women to organize, become educated, develop sharper analysis. These are all the keys to political resistance.
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Lori Nov 2
Replying to @TheMCSquad_dc
We’ve seen some serious improvements in Asian American media representation and production, and I think hashtags played some role in that. So political resistance can start in really small ways that connect to bigger movements.
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Lori Nov 2
Replying to @TheMCSquad_dc
A5 Digital media has been key. Twitter has allowed WOC to become visible through hashtags. For Asian Americans, key convos have been facilitated by through
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Lori retweeted
The Melanin Collective Nov 2
Q5: Are there forms of political resistance created by women of color that are adapted to this day?
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Lori retweeted
Women's Wire Nov 2
A4: When WOC advocate & co-create, like , , w/ , + & w/ , we’re not just changing narratives, we’re building intergenerational social justice movements (2/2)
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Lori Nov 2
Yep, we need both kinds!
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