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Kyle E. Mitchell
journeyman deal mechanic, antinomian lawyer
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Kyle E. Mitchell 15h
Replying to @ReBeccaOrg @maybekatz
I’d also say that some folks choose to do lots of time for lots of money at points in their lives. They always pay a psychic price, but sometimes it’s worth it. Savings. Clear debt. Deal with a sudden money need, like elder care or a medical bill.
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Kyle E. Mitchell 15h
Replying to @ReBeccaOrg @maybekatz
Folks only have so much active brain time to give. Stacking open source on top of a demanding job can be a necessary cure to 8-5 boredom or self-immolation, depending.
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Kyle E. Mitchell retweeted
Neil Gaiman Dec 9
I like copyright. It feeds and houses me. It doesn't need to feed and house my great grandchildren, though.
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Kyle E. Mitchell Dec 9
Replying to @ReBeccaOrg @maybekatz
In short: Don’t take money from people who like you. Take money from people who owe you.
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Kyle E. Mitchell Dec 9
Replying to @ReBeccaOrg @maybekatz
I partly agree. Just giving money for open source, as through Patreon without valuable rewards, doesn’t do anything about maintainer-crunching scope creep or entitlement. But paying money for something specific, bounded, and necessary, like a license to use at work, does.
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Kyle E. Mitchell Dec 8
"notso fasto" is still funny.
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Kyle E. Mitchell Dec 8
Replying to @graydon_pub
Website to publish community-developed resources: 1. guide to dual licensing for devs, including how to pick a public license 2. guide to dual licensing for users & customers 3. toolkit of legal forms and guides for devs 4. showcase of small and independent dual licensors
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Kyle E. Mitchell Dec 8
Would you be interested in talking about or working on tools and forms for more traditional, manual-mode dual licensing?
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Kyle E. Mitchell Dec 7
Replying to @codinghorror
Essential tool in the modern motorcycle garage. If you're insecure, just call it a "heat gun". Nobody has to know.
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Kyle E. Mitchell Dec 7
Immigration lawyer does AMA on Hacker News. You couldn't possibly guess what happens next!
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Kyle E. Mitchell Dec 7
It's really easy in . Really, really easy.
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Kyle E. Mitchell Dec 6
Replying to @webmink
Any chance you have a blog post somewhere on that topic?
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Kyle E. Mitchell Dec 6
Replying to @webmink
I'm sorry. I don't understand. Might you say it another way?
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Kyle E. Mitchell Dec 6
Replying to @webmink
I don't think I've put it that succinctly before. Thanks for drawing it out of me!
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Kyle E. Mitchell Dec 6
Replying to @webmink
Strengthen copyleft. Make it grokable. Remind developers that strong-copyleft licenses can serve both idealistic and business goals.
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Kyle E. Mitchell Dec 6
Replying to @webmink
It's not just more or less, but what kind. There's more free/open, sure, but it's heavily skewed toward libraries, frameworks, "infrastructure", dev tools, and other inputs to end-user software. That reflects broad adoption by the non-free software industry.
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Kyle E. Mitchell Dec 6
Replying to @webmink
Do I need one? I echoed the point I think I read first from Bradley: "Open source won", but we've less and less practical software freedom. See also the general trend toward permissive licensing.
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Kyle E. Mitchell Dec 6
Replying to @webmink
If open source is succeeding and software freedom isn't, how can they be the same? More open libraries and other building blocks. But many of those end up in few if any free end-user applications. Software freedom doesn't succeed by supercharging nonfree development.
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Kyle E. Mitchell Dec 6
Replying to @webmink
I think that's the criticism: focusing on the benefits at the expense of ethic doesn't succeed in spreading the ethic. It's possible, but not necessary, to infer the ethic from the benefits. But as end users, as a rule, that's not what we see corporate open source adopters doing.
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Kyle E. Mitchell Dec 6
Replying to @webmink
Was this a criticism of the OSI mission statement, as an abstraction of OSD?
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