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Kelsey Hightower
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Kelsey Hightower 8h
Blowing into game cartridges.
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Michael Friedrich 🦊 Aug 8
Fixing your demo during the talk. The way. 😎
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Kelsey Hightower Aug 8
Replying to @olly_shaw
Kubernetes is a layer on top of what you are already doing. Take an application, run it on Linux, then attach it to a load balancer. The fundamentals are the same as they were 20 years ago. Kubernetes meets people where they're at and offers an automated way of doing things.
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Kelsey Hightower Aug 8
fn serverless(code, conf) (url) { C = container(code) O = orchestration(C, conf) S = service_mesh(O) T = test(S) return reduce(C,O,S,T) }
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Kelsey Hightower Aug 7
Replying to @sszuecs
In my previous thread I encouraged people to start with ingress. Nginx, Envoy, etc, they all work pretty well. Service mesh is not something everyone needs, and to be honest, most people already have one, DNS + kube-proxy can be considered a very basic service mesh.
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Kelsey Hightower Aug 7
Replying to @sszuecs
Even before gRPC there were many client side load balancing frameworks that allow you leverage a "service mesh" without the additional process.
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Kelsey Hightower Aug 7
Replying to @sszuecs
That's why the community is working on things like proxyless gRPC; service mesh without the sidecar.
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Matt Moore Aug 7
There are lot's of hot takes right now on meshes, and some folks criticizing what Kelsey says here, but this is just a suggestion not "the way" different folks learn different ways. Let me make an analogy 🧵
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Shaun Norris Aug 6
Replying to @jbeda @kelseyhightower
This feels a bit like “no good deed goes unpunished”. has massively advanced learning around k8s and if people foolish enough to run KTHW in production as-is, then they didn’t read his docs very well.
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Brian Dorsey Aug 6
I appreciate this thread. It works at two levels: * a stand-alone explaination of how the pieces fit together. * a guide for deeply learning each piece. I’m personally unlikely to do a deep DIY soon, but it’s still the best explanation I’ve read of what a service mesh *is*.
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Kelsey Hightower Aug 6
When I started in tech, I thought all I had to learn was Linux, and how to type with both hands. I was way off.
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Simpsons Against DevOps Aug 6
Anyone else heard of this mesh thing is talking about?
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Kelsey Hightower Aug 6
Replying to @_krr12
I find it's different depending on the subject. There are things I can just read about and feel like I've learned something. Things like cooking, I need to prove to myself that I can actually make the dish, and like how it tastes.
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Kelsey Hightower Aug 6
The best way to learn is how you learn.
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Kelsey Hightower Aug 6
Haha, I have, and then I took it to someone who knew how to go deeper and got my car fixed.
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wolfman ~# Aug 6
Yes! There's the way the system is designed to work, the way it is documented to work, and the way that it actually works, and wow that third one is sure full of surprises.
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Kelsey Hightower Aug 6
Replying to @dekkagaijin
Kubernetes disappears and the thing that sits on top becomes the primary concern.
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Kelsey Hightower Aug 6
Replying to @dekkagaijin
Well, to your point, I would not advise people start by rolling their own TCP stack as an entrypoint to learning more about a service mesh. I guess it's all relative.
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Kelsey Hightower Aug 6
Replying to @dekkagaijin
Maybe that's the disconnect. My target audience are the people who are paid to fix the problems.
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Kelsey Hightower Aug 6
I wish we could setup infrastructure, and have it just work forever, but that's not the case. When things break it's on us to troubleshoot, which requires low level knowledge. Cars on the other hand tend to work, backed by legal standards, and over 100 years of mass production.
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