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Katherine J. Wu, Ph.D.
science writer, producer. Was , PhD , . she/her. katherine_wu [at] wgbh [dot] org
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Katherine J. Wu, Ph.D. retweeted
Laura Helmuth 6h
Scoop: USDA has ordered scientists to say research they've published in peer-reviewed journals is "preliminary." By on
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Katherine J. Wu, Ph.D. retweeted
Joe Palca 5h
Looking for some new folks to follow? Our NPR Scicommers are now in one list!
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Katherine J. Wu, Ph.D. 3h
Asteroids can be tough to spot against the black backdrop of space. But this telescope has donned the cosmic equivalent of night vision goggles to help us out. My latest for
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Katherine J. Wu, Ph.D. 23h
Replying to @dangaristo
Totally agree with this! Always estimate up. That being said, if for some reason I am 100% sure they don't have a doctorate, I will use their full name to avoid gendering them.
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Katherine J. Wu, Ph.D. retweeted
Roxanne Khamsi Apr 18
Wow -- hats off to the team & contributors for an extremely timely and thought-provoking issue on women's reproductive health. This menstrual cycle infographic alone is jam-packed with fascinating details:
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Katherine J. Wu, Ph.D. Apr 18
Replying to @tararaam_
Yeah, that's real. I haven't so far because a) I don't know that it'll change their behavior for the better and b) it could make them antagonistic. On the other hand, if they're not called out, they'll *definitely* treat others this way.
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Katherine J. Wu, Ph.D. Apr 18
Replying to @viruswhiz
It's in mine as well! My guess is some members of the aforementioned demographic don't bother scrolling down...
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Katherine J. Wu, Ph.D. Apr 18
Replying to @KatherineJWu
*for me, “someone” is always an older white man. Coincidence?
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Katherine J. Wu, Ph.D. Apr 18
— when someone* misattributes your title in an email (Dear Ms. Wu...), do you politely correct them, or do you let it slide? Why?
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Katherine J. Wu, Ph.D. Apr 18
A bunch of California's earthquakes fly under the radar—but that might not be the case anymore. My latest for
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Katherine J. Wu, Ph.D. retweeted
Bethany Brookshire Apr 18
p<0.05 has been a goal for scientists for YEARS. It's based on one single sentence in a since monograph from 1925. One. Single. Sentence.
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Katherine J. Wu, Ph.D. Apr 18
Someday, you might be able to go the doctor and receive a score tabulating your genetic risk for obesity. Would you do it? For yourself? For your kids? My latest for
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Katherine J. Wu, Ph.D. retweeted
Ed Yong Apr 17
Speaking tooth to power
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Katherine J. Wu, Ph.D. Apr 17
It took six months, but I finally have a name tag outside my office! Maybe this means the mysterious ⁦⁩ bandit will stop stealing my chair...
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Katherine J. Wu, Ph.D. retweeted
Amanda Grennell Apr 16
Scientists solved LA's photochemical smog problem in the 1950s, but it took more than 20 years to put their solution in place. How they did it can help scientists address much different air pollution today. My latest for , thanks to !
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Katherine J. Wu, Ph.D. Apr 17
Scientists have restored some function in the brains of dead pigs... and it's sparking a lot of complicated discussions about organ donation, lab animals, and the definition of consciousness. So where does this leave us? My latest for
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Katherine J. Wu, Ph.D. Apr 16
Feeling the wind in ? That's because the show is TOMORROW at and our lineup is going to blow you away: 🍃 🍃 🍃 🍃 Rachel Rangel 🍃 Tickets:
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Katherine J. Wu, Ph.D. Apr 15
Turns out the Moon is a bit of a cosmic punching bag. But there's good news, too: There's probably water locked within. My latest for
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Katherine J. Wu, Ph.D. retweeted
Washington Post Opinions Apr 12
It matters who we champion in science, and write
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Katherine J. Wu, Ph.D. retweeted
The Story Collider Apr 12
This week: When Laura Kehoe writes about a surprising chimp behavior, the media takes it out of context and the situation spirals out of control, and when The Colbert Report calls about her research, finds an unexpected friend and collaborator.
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