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Kai Brach
Last week I learned that the Dutch call sprinkles ‘Disko Dip’ and I still get a lot of joy out of that fact.
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Kai Brach Aug 22
Replying to @kaibrach
By the way in Australia we call it Hundreds & Thousands. 🤷‍♂️ What is it called in your country?
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Mandy Michael Aug 22
Replying to @kaibrach
Gotta be honest, that’s way better than hundreds and thousands.
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Kai Brach Aug 22
Replying to @Mandy_Kerr
Oh totally!!
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Marc Edwards Aug 22
Replying to @kaibrach @Mandy_Kerr
Awesome! Time for a campaign to change it to disco dip in 🇦🇺. I don’t think the PM is busy with anything else right now.
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Gareth Townsend Aug 22
Replying to @kaibrach
I am happy to learn this fact
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Jack (appear offline) Aug 22
Which PM?
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Owen McFadzen Aug 22
Replying to @kaibrach
In Denmark 🇩🇰 they call it “Tivoli” after their own amusement park 🎡🎢🎠
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Marc Edwards Aug 22
¯\_(ツ)_/¯
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Owen Williams ⚡ Aug 22
Replying to @kaibrach
Omg I thouGht it didn't even exist this is amazing
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nikolina100 Aug 22
Replying to @kaibrach
That’s pretty fun! But “sprinkles” seems happier somehow. ✨🌈
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Jürgen Siebert Aug 22
Replying to @kaibrach
In Deutschland: Nonpareille
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Prince of Arabica Aug 24
Replying to @kaibrach @e13Kiki
In German it's "bunte Streusel", which translates to colorful sprinkles. Or "Zuckerperlen" meaning sugar pearls. Germans = no humor. But Dutch also call peanut butter "pindakaas", basically peanut cheese.... I love the Dutch.
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Jens Lykke Brandt Aug 27
Replying to @kaibrach
"Krymmel" in Danish. From the German word "Krümel" which translates to "small crumb". The colourful variant (in small staves) is called "Tivoli Krymmel" (but Dr. Oetker calls it "Party Mix").
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