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Julian Stodd
Author 'Social Leadership Handbook' & 'My 1st 100 days'. Blogs . Founder . Sometime artist. Occasional thinker
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Julian Stodd retweeted
juandoming 2h
The Wrong Currency | Julian Stodd's Learning Blog ⁦
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Julian Stodd 2h
When will we start to call it ‘Women’s Football’ and ‘Men’s Football’? Or just ‘Football’, and surprise ourselves when the team turns up.
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Julian Stodd 2h
I’m offering five different Certification Programmes from July this year. Get in touch for a copy of the brochure, or to find out more. All of these are practical and applied, designed as full Social Learning experiences. 1. ‘Foundations of Social Leader…
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Julian Stodd retweeted
Barry Verdin 👨‍🎤 2h
Formal systems may operate on financial currency, but social ones do not
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Julian Stodd retweeted
Helen Burness 3h
"We will need to learn how to hold, and deploy the right currencies... The currencies of , , , and may be beyond " . So I ask you - what currencies do you use, and what do you receive?
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Julian Stodd retweeted
Nigel Paine 23h
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Julian Stodd 4h
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Julian Stodd 4h
Replying to @wadds
Servant humans back for Spring. Where’s my bread?
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Julian Stodd 5h
This is why networks like are so valuable: they create space outside the system, where we can share uncertainty. But they must remain interconnected to other spaces too of course :-)
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Julian Stodd retweeted
Nigel Paine 5h
The core issue is helping people think about, and work on, the organization. They need covert permission to do this, and the tools to understand the organization of the organization.
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Julian Stodd 5h
Being a mentor with the Foundation, for almost seven years now, is one of my proudest achievements. Do consider getting involved in this awesome programme.
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Julian Stodd 5h
When asked to describe the moderators of individual behaviour, for 30% it was the ‘rules of the Organisation’, and for 70% it was the ‘judgement of others’ in their community. Which is no surprise... we fear exclusion, which is why dissenting voices are silenced.
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Julian Stodd 5h
‘Story Listening’ also a key skill for that Board... the biggest innovation programme i ever encountered failed because Exec lacked humility to listen to the stories that were told. They were excellent individuals, conditioned (by dominant culture) to speak more than to listen
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Julian Stodd 5h
That’s neat. In my own research, just under 60% of people say they would demonstrate their engagement by ‘experimenting’, if given space (and if they feel trusted). That has 2 key elements: ‘control of investment’, and ‘reputation’ economy of reward.
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Julian Stodd 5h
I think most Organisations already have everything they need within their four walls, & their wider engaged community. All the ideas, all the potential, all the resource. They just have to earn the right to access it: engender trust, fairness, recognition, the reputation economy.
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Julian Stodd 5h
Most interestingly, they said the key to their success was the ‘trust’ they had in the guard they bribed to lower the voltage in the electric fence to power it. So their ‘success’ in ‘innovation’ came from trust, opposition, desperation, etc
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Julian Stodd 5h
The most innovative group i ever interviewed were not from a tech company, or startup, they were a group of septuagenarian former Japanese prisoners of war, who had build a radio out of scraps, in the direst of need.
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Julian Stodd 5h
It’s worth noting that space, freedom, and time, are the things that people often ask for, but provocation, desperation, and need, are more often drivers of innovation. In the Landscape of Trust research, 54% of people wanted ‘freedom’ more than anything, if they were trusted.
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Julian Stodd 5h
In the Landscape of Trust research, 54% of people said they had ‘low’ or ‘no’ trust in the Organisation they worked for. 70% said that ‘consequence’ was held in social systems, not rules.
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Julian Stodd 5h
Partly it relates to the technology itself: in our recent research in the NHS, people identified 17 technologies that they used on a daily basis to be ‘effective’, 16 of which were not owned by the NHS. 70% said it was because they ‘trusted’ those techs more.
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