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Jason Farago
Art critic and editor of
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Jason Farago 18m
One taught me love / one taught me patience etc etc etc
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Jason Farago 2h
As MoMA undertakes the biggest rehang of its permanent collection in two decades, they've said goodbye to Kathy Halbreich, Laura Hoptman, Klaus Biesenbach, and now a photo chief too. A lot of institutional memory leaving at a very tricky time
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Jason Farago Nov 12
My dear friend Silas Martí on the "sad, narcissistic exercise" of this year's Bienal de São Paulo, a "feeble circus" wildly out of sync with a Brazil on the abyss
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Jason Farago Nov 11
We like our wars to have clear moral purpose and unambiguous villains, like the Civil War or World War II. Most wars, however, are like World War I—wars barren of virtue, wars that reveal civilization as a veneer over barbarity… I went to Ypres last year.
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Jason Farago Nov 11
Replying to @ishaantharoor
The biggest novel of the season in France is “Frère d’âme,” about two Senegalese riflemen on the western front
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Jason Farago Nov 9
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Jason Farago Nov 8
Climate is culture; climate is war. Very glad to see this thundering essay by my friend translated into English
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Deborah Solomon Nov 8
Warhol's "Large Sleep," one of the lesser-known standouts in his retrospective, riffs on Duchamp's famous "Large Glass." But in place of Duchamp's ever-yearning bachelors, Warhol gives us an image of a male contentment and deep sleep.
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James McAuley Nov 5
In light of Charlie Hebdo survivor Philippe Lançon winning the Prix Fémina, one of France's biggest literary prizes, re-upping my interview with him from earlier this year. Also, if you haven't already, read "Le Lambeau." Absolutely beautiful
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Jason Farago Nov 5
Replying to @jsf
An English-language interview with Philippe Lançon: “Writing is a very long road, as is repairing a jaw. In both instances, you have to be patient”
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Jason Farago Nov 5
“Not just the book of the year, the book of the decade; the book of a whole generation, wounded, traumatized, but fighting on after Charlie Hebdo and the Bataclan.” Philippe Lançon, shot twice in the jaw, won one of France’s biggest literary prizes today:
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Benjamin Kunkel Nov 2
The most important and also the most optimistic piece I've read on the IPCC's scary recent report:
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grant k johnson Nov 2
“starting it in the late 1960s feels like yet another case of the Met thinking too small at the Breuer — where it promised it would explore themes across time and geography, but almost never followed through.”
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Jason Farago Nov 2
Replying to @ZacharyHSmall
in Cady Noland's work, certainly; more obliquely in Lutz Bacher... The show grew on me the more I embraced its hopelessness; it seems to argue for the inefficacy of facts both in politics and in art, with mental breakdown the logical outcome
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Jason Farago Nov 2
I vacillated for weeks on "Everything Is Connected," the CalArts-heavy conspiracy show at the Met Breuer. And I have grown to admire its uncommon pessimism, in which every muckraker becomes a crank at last
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Jason Farago Oct 31
Fernanda Brenner, founder of Pivô in São Paulo and one of Brazil's best curators, writes of a visit to MASP's "Histórias Afro-Atlânticas" while Jair Bolsonaro's vengeful supporters marched outside
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Jason Farago Oct 31
The model. Last week to see the magnificent but discreet 50th anniversary show of Paula Cooper Gallery, an anchor of integrity in an art world transformed
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Jason Farago Oct 26
I loved everything about "Armenia!" except that chintzy exclamation point
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Jason Farago Oct 20
So viel Europa war nie
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Jason Farago Oct 20
Replying to @jsf
Two more: - Vintage prints of Ed White's spacewalk, shot by James McDivitt from Gemini 4, 1965 - Mark Rothko, untitled, 1969 (coll. NGA)
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