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jordwalke
Maker of things: ReactJS. Working on: . At: Facebook Engineering.
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jordwalke 15h
And getting developers on board is important for their bottom line. Remember “developers developers developers?” Can’t build a new platform without developers.
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jordwalke 19h
Replying to @ClashCityKing
I don’t think we are at risk of anyone getting into OSS for the money right now. Something to consider the effects of though in a hypothetical future where it is possible.
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jordwalke 20h
Replying to @rossipedia
And that prevents two separate OSS offerings from forming.
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jordwalke 20h
Replying to @rossipedia
Whereas retroactive compensation ensures that companies don’t hesitate to try in commercial settings.
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jordwalke 20h
Replying to @rossipedia
I’m not sure. Maybe that’s one approach. I don’t really want non commercial users to get significantly degraded experiences though. I wonder if such an up front agreement has those negative consequences.
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jordwalke 20h
Replying to @ClashCityKing
People looking to get different things out of OSS. MIT is different than GPL. MS VSCode is not charity. MS is a for-profit business. But I’m still glad it’s open source. I think the common thread in OSS is not “zero profit” but preventing abusive lock-in. There’s demand for that.
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jordwalke 21h
Replying to @BlaineBublitz
Anyone who hopes one day to work on OSS software, not having to be located in one of five tech hub cities, should consider helping out in some way.
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jordwalke 21h
Replying to @BlaineBublitz
I had the same realization but this doesn’t benefit one project. It benefits all of them and all the ones that don’t exist but would get to exist due to better cooperation between big companies and OSS. No one OSS dev has time to build this. Maybe many of them together could.
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jordwalke 21h
Replying to @ClashCityKing
Can you explain why it doesn’t make sense to you? How about at least in the case when a giant company benefits from it?
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jordwalke 21h
Replying to @jordwalke
Whoever stewards this, must continually reenforce a positive atmosphere. OSS devs feed on positive recognition. Big cos aren’t so different - they include individuals who also want to be associated with companies who receive positive recognition from their peers.
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jordwalke 21h
definitely does a lot to give back! There’s room to do even better and I feel that at this point the community outside of big companies can start shifting culture so that even more companies follow.
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jordwalke 21h
Replying to @ClashCityKing
No one size fits all right? Either way, if someone produces value and a big company benefits from it, I think some compensation is appropriate even if it wasn’t the original goal.
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jordwalke 21h
Replying to @jordwalke
We need to surface the issue of companies funding OSS in a way that benefits both OSS devs and the large cos. You don’t want large cos to pull out of OSS. You want OSS to get more funding, and want the large cos to feel they benefit from positive exposure, and more reliable tech.
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jordwalke 21h
Replying to @jordwalke
You don’t want this to turn into a cheap leaderboard or checklist. You don’t want to turn it into a shake game. We need mutual positive reenforcement between OSS devs and companies.
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jordwalke 21h
Replying to @jordwalke
This is tough to get right. Not all contributions can be quantified easily. Some contributions and funding are private and based on contracting. Some contributions occur via related but separate projects. Companies donate via many separate channels. One channel can’t track it all
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jordwalke 21h
I’d love to see a maintained list of large companies, the various open source technologies they use, and the amount they contribute back in terms of code, and OSS funding. Companies need to give back, but devs need to show that they are watching and select employment accordingly.
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jordwalke 21h
Replying to @jaredforsyth
Imagine esy build —disallow=disk,network and it would not add certain sub libraries to the compiler linking commands and DLL path in the app if those sub-libraries use disk or network.
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jordwalke 21h
Replying to @jaredforsyth
One downside is that packages will need to split and refactor into many packages just to allow depending on the safer components. Maybe a package manager could have built in support for allowing them all to exist in one package but prevent linking of certain packages.
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jordwalke 21h
Replying to @jaredforsyth
One limited but important constraint is on what happens during builds. Builds should be isolated and reproducible and this can be enforced technically. But when consuming libraries at runtime it’s a little harder to enforce technically. Has to be social.
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jordwalke 21h
Replying to @jaredforsyth
I love this idea. It could be enforced via a combination of technical (file system / OS sandboxing) and social conventions. Make the permissions part of the package config.
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