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John Redwood
MP for Wokingham. I don't reply to tweets but constituents can contact me directly at: john.redwood.mp@parliament.uk. You will receive a prompt reply.
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John Redwood 20h
On Friday I spent time with Wokingham BC to discuss their response to the Govt consultation on a network of A roads that have strategic importance, to supplement the national network of motorways & trunk roads. These would continue to be under the control of the local authority.
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John Redwood 21h
Inaccuracies on my Wikipedia entry
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John Redwood Feb 17
I find it strange that three Heads of Security Agencies had to speak out for fear that Brexit would damage exchanges of information between France, Germany and the UK after Brexit. Why should it? This seems to me to be another non problem, unless the EU side wants to make it one.
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John Redwood Feb 16
Next Tuesday I've been invited to give a lecture at Speaker’s House in Parliament on the opportunities Brexit affords the UK. My vision will include discussing how to spend the money we save from our contributions which will boost both our growth rate & our balance of payments.
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John Redwood Feb 15
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John Redwood Feb 15
Replying to @johnredwood
The IMF want us to abolish the regular increases in the state pension which they think is too generous & to put through a series of tax increases. They want to hike VAT on heating fuel from 5% to 20% & to put up taxes on the self employed. What a bizarre & negative mix.
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John Redwood Feb 15
The IMF was one of many international bodies & opinion formers who wanted the UK to stay in the EU. They misjudged that call, misunderstanding UK voters. Now they have issued an update report telling us that we have to take strong policy action to succeed
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John Redwood Feb 14
Replying to @johnredwood
While it will be no surprise to those who have followed the votes in the Commons or read the PM’s speeches it will come as a surprise to those that say the Govt is about to reinvent a customs union, forego an independent trade policy & accept the need to follow all new EU laws.
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John Redwood Feb 14
Replying to @johnredwood
It is also clear from the text of the speech that the UK will regain control of its laws & regulations & will take the powers necessary to amend & improve the law codes once out as we see fit.
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John Redwood Feb 14
Replying to @johnredwood
It is clear from the text that it remains Govt policy that we will leave the EU, the Customs Union & the single market in accordance with the Article 50 letter and Act, and the EU Withdrawal Bill.
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John Redwood Feb 14
That Boris speech - we know that the Foreign Secretary’s speech today was checked and approved by 10 Downing Street, and is a statement of government policy.
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John Redwood Feb 14
Replying to @johnredwood
Nationalised industries had poor records when it came to employee relations. Labour’s In place of strife approach when in government failed, and Labour lost in 1979 following bruising public sector strikes.
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John Redwood Feb 14
Replying to @johnredwood
Some parts of the private sector have failed to reach good agreements with their staff to ensure smooth running of the trains. Is there any reason to suppose if the workforce was nationalised it would be any easier to reach an agreement to use the Guards for customer support?
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John Redwood Feb 14
Replying to @johnredwood
The main reason for the high cost of rail fares and the high taxpayer subsidy is the high cost of providing the large infrastructure the railway requires, and maintaining and improving it. Quite often the reasons for failures of service rest with the performance of Network Rail.
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John Redwood Feb 14
It is misleading to say we can nationalise the railways and this will solve all their problems. The bulk of the assets are already nationalised through Network Rail. The State owns all the tracks, signals, most of the stations, trackside assets and the land the railway uses.
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John Redwood Feb 12
Replying to @johnredwood
If we look at history we see that many nationalised industries didn't earn enough to pay the costs of their capital. There were frequent injections of new capital & writes off of old at the expense of the taxpayer. One must conclude this is an expensive policy for taxpayers.
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John Redwood Feb 12
Replying to @johnredwood
Whilst in the first round of any such policy it might prove popular with those who benefit from the confiscation, the second round effects are very negative for many. Investors will be put off buying & building assets in the UK if they think a government might simply steal them.
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John Redwood Feb 12
The costs of nationalisation - There are good reasons why advanced democracies do not usually elect governments that say they will confiscate assets held by private owners.
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John Redwood Feb 11
Replying to @johnredwood
In fifteen years time we might have a more integrated United States of Europe from the Eurozone, or the zone might have broken up altogether. That will be determined by voters in a range of countries, and by events and markets.
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John Redwood Feb 11
Replying to @johnredwood
Most 15 year forecasts are likely to be wildly wrong. The longer the period of the forecast the more other things can happen that may have a big impact.
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