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John Hawks
I'm a paleoanthropologist, exploring ancient sites and human genomes to uncover our origins. Follow along!
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John Hawks retweeted
Molly Selba Jun 18
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LTU Palaeoscience Jun 18
Prof Herries () showing the fieldschool students the DNH 7 female robustus skull. It looks like we might have a large male cranium coming out of the ground rather than just a maxilla. Tomorrow we dig again to find out!
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John Hawks Jun 17
Replying to @KanDerWat @Qafzeh
It's far from obvious which of those fossils represent "our" lineage.
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t Jun 16
This should be made widely known.
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Zach Throckmorton Jun 16
Interesting story on about how demographic change in contemporary Kansas is effecting linguistic change: Great work, ! cc:
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Roberto Sáez Jun 15
Hominin skulls! Lateral cranial comparison of Homo naledi crania to crania of other hominin species. Image credit: Hawks et al, doi: 10.7554/eLife.24232.
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John S. Mead Jun 14
Check out the latest by a child embedded in sediment from the base of the Chute in the cave
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Kim Tommy Jun 14
I am so happy! I made these for month in celebration of the hominin fossil record of the world. They have been so well received with university profs and teachers from all over the world asking for copies for teaching!!
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National Geographic Jun 14
Watch the amazing moment announced a new discovery during
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LTU Palaeoscience Jun 14
First of the season on day 2 of digging at the 2018 fieldschool, which was wonderfully found by the landowner who is attending the fieldschool & digging with us this year
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John Hawks Jun 13
Replying to @Evo_Explorer @NCSE
Outstanding!
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John S. Mead Jun 13
I am VERY EXCITED to announce that I have been appointed by as one of their new "NCSE Teacher Ambassadors" who will be working to promote throughout the - Because
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John Hawks Jun 13
This is troubling: Is one of the pillars of open access in cultural anthropology also a vipers' nest of abuse and bullying?
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John Hawks Jun 13
This seems like a serious missed opportunity. After all, there’s some chance that an actual human may have some exotic unknown DNA (not canine!). A simple filter by centroid distance from known population clusters might turn up interesting biology.
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John Hawks retweeted
Huw Groucutt Jun 13
Today's refit. Preparatory flake on a rhyolite Levallois core from the Nefud Desert. > 100,000 years ago someone sat by a small lake, struck several flakes to shape the core then struck a Levallois flake, which they took off somewhere else, leaving core and preparation flakes.
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John Hawks Jun 12
We can only compare to modern human societies that come into contact with each other. In every known case, mating interactions are varied: sometimes passionate and caring, sometimes arranged, sometimes violent and nonconsensual.
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John Hawks Jun 12
"These findings indicate more long-term, complex interaction between humans and Neandertals than previously appreciated."
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jim mallet Jun 12
Replying to @WTF_R_species
Barcoding gaps have been disproved, but if there were gaps, and COI was neutral (it isn't), then mtDNA often coalesces less than say 1Mya. This date has nothing to do with species origins, nor bottlenecking, nor does it say much about the rest of the genome. It's just wrong.
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John Hawks Jun 12
I concur, although I do not think there is any easy solution to this problem. People yearn for a finite and definite number. Even population geneticists behave as if such approximations are real.
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John Hawks Jun 12
Harassers Aren't Brilliant Jerks, They're Bad Scientists--and They Cost All of Us
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