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John Hawks
I'm a paleoanthropologist, exploring ancient sites and human genomes to uncover our origins. Follow along!
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John Hawks retweeted
Timothy Cox 5h
And for the mammal lovers...a reporter gene marking most of the developing nervous system in a mouse embryo ....in 3D
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John Hawks 9h
Replying to @johnhawks
Many of those museum drawers haven't been opened because the collectors treated their fossils as trade secrets and used their exclusive knowledge to exclude others from studying. Now that they are long-dead, the collections have been gathering dust. You can't take it with you!
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John Hawks 9h
Replying to @johnhawks
This is also why incremental scientific publication is so important. Too many paleontologists sit on excavation notes and data for years and years, never publishing. It is sad but true that many die without making adequate information about context available to other scientists.
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John Hawks 9h
Replying to @johnhawks
What to do? Making data available should be one part of a broader effort to revisit original fossil sites, try to quantify what can be known about context for historic sites, and excavate new fossils to replicate what was found in the past.
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John Hawks 9h
Replying to @johnhawks
Making collections available can perpetuate the lack of context or make it worse as outside researchers start generating publications using unverifiable assumptions about context and associations.
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John Hawks 9h
Replying to @johnhawks
But I have a lot of experience working in old collections. If the drawer hasn't been opened, chances are a huge amount of contextual information is lost. Where exactly did the fossils come from in their site? What decisions were made during the preparation or lack of preparation?
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John Hawks 9h
Replying to @johnhawks
I'm sure it's true, as the story notes, that "there are drawers here in the museum that haven't been opened for decades". Putting data online for researchers to use might create great value from existing collections.
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John Hawks 9h
This move to digitize the "dark matter" of natural history collections and make them broadly available is newsworthy and interesting. But it doesn't go far enough.
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John Hawks retweeted
Chanda Prescod-Weinstein 🙅🏽‍♀️ 🇧🇧🌈 Dec 7
Replying to @sciam
I wrote about the allegations against Neil deGrasse Tyson for . "Tchiya Amet is a Black woman who will never join me on the list of African-American Women with PhDs in Physics. She deserved better. Our whole community did."
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John Hawks retweeted
Sean Carroll Dec 7
Replying to @seanmcarroll
All sorts of wild ideas should be contemplated in physics. And they are, all the time. But most *theoretical* papers don't come with press releases attached. That's probably a good norm to preserve, all else being equal.
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John Hawks retweeted
Andy I.R. Herries Dec 6
Early Homo & Paranthropus from Swartkrans Cave, South Africa. Contemporary at ~ 2 million years? the issue is the Homo mandible comes from what was described as a chocolate brown infill into Member 1, so perhaps not but you can see them on the Drimolen field school
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John Hawks retweeted
Mahi Tahi Dec 6
about to begin. We will share lots of Māori student experiences of , like this one.
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John Hawks retweeted
Chanda Prescod-Weinstein 🙅🏽‍♀️ 🇧🇧🌈 Dec 6
Replying to @IBJIYONGI
It’s fine to be an activist in grad school — I did it! But there’s no substitute for developing your technical knowledge base. Networking is good; it is not a substitute. Doing public science is good; it is not a substitute.
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John Hawks Dec 5
"Preprints and Citations: Should Non-Peer Reviewed Material Be Included in Article References?"
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John Hawks Dec 5
"All three of these women say that Tyson’s behavior toward them was not simply inappropriate or clumsy; it was harassment."
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John Hawks retweeted
Robyn Pickering Dec 5
It is prettttty dry in the Northern Cape, there’s been no rain for months. So we were amazed and delighted to find these tiny dripping stalactites in a dolomite crevice. With thirsty little bees having a drink 🐝
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John Hawks retweeted
Eleanor ML Scerri Dec 4
I am thrilled to finally be able to announce that I will be taking up a W2 (Assoc. Prof) position heading the new Lise Meitner Group on Pan African Evolution at the ! I will hiring my team in 2019 - watch this space!
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John Hawks retweeted
Pontus Skoglund Dec 3
Really cool study of human ancient DNA retrieved from chewed birch bark in Stone Age Scandinavia by Natalia Kashuba, et al. Clearly authentic with typical Mesolithic hunter-gatherer-type ancestry
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John Hawks retweeted
Trooper Ben Dec 2
My Trooper hat is off to you Coach Snyder... So many fond memories at your stadium. Kansas is proud of you. Kstate is proud of you. Manhattan is proud of you. Your players are proud of you. It's been an honor for our Troopers to escort you after every home game.
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John Hawks Dec 2
Replying to @Aus_RichAlex @mackfink
Outstanding underwater Paleolithic work has been done in Gibraltar. Elsewhere, two hominin fossils have been found as a result of dredging, in the North Sea and in the Taiwan Strait.
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