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John Hawks
I'm a paleoanthropologist, exploring ancient sites and human genomes to uncover our origins. Follow along!
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John Hawks 11h
Read this essay together with the Sheela Athreya essay in , and consider how much our idea of "anatomically modern humans" nowadays is trying to shoehorn data into a pre-existing, and mostly obsolete model.
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John Hawks 11h
"The H. naledi assemblage represents a stark challenge to simplistic, linear narratives of the origin of modernity in the hominin fossil record." Nice piece by in
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Lee Berger 13h
What a great series of essays in @anthropologynews very much worth reading them all - well done to the editors and authors
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Lee Berger 13h
A thoughtful and insightful exploration of the conundrum that is - a must read for students of the subject as our understanding grows concerning the complexity of human origins by
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John Hawks 14h
This is equally true of fossil remains attributed to transitional industries in Europe: "To examine their features exclusively within an archaic/modern binary is a typological and essentialist question focused on classification, not evolutionary history."
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John Hawks 14h
"We aren’t seeking to find a 'first' or to overturn the story of human evolution; we’re seeking to make the evolutionary narrative more inclusive." Sheela Athreya of on her work with Indian Paleolitihic sites.
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John Hawks 14h
"To reduce H. sapiens evolution and behavior to the binary of 'archaic' and 'modern' and then search for the first appearance of the latter in our biology or artifacts is an exercise in essentialism."
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John Hawks 15h
Just think of how many stories of significant discoveries start with a young researcher investigating an obscure gene system: CRISPR, 16s rRNA, HERVs -- they all started well off the mainstream, recipes for career failure. When will we learn?
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Alexander M. Kim 23h
Replying to @amwkim
Familial reconstruction w/ IcMLkin (Lipatov et al. 2015) - degree of relatedness, uniparental lineages, sex, age at death -> no long-standing matrilineages but multigenerational patrilineages - bronze daggers: status inheritance?
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Alexander M. Kim 22h
Replying to @amwkim
One important upside of dense genomic sampling at single localities – greater visibility of outliers and better constraints on particular incoming ancestries' arrival times. Gonur Tepe as a great case study of this.
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Ludovic Orlando 22h
The conference started not even 2 hours ago, and genome-scale data from 1000+ individuals have already been presented. That s over 2 ancient genomes per every attendee. Wonder what will be the final ratio on friday.
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Dan Hicks Sep 18
Stanford’s Ian Hodder making a sustained bid to revive the hashtag in his keynote at
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Graham Coop Sep 18
Maybe Darwin just set up a periodic "I'm still not wrong" reminder.
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Clive Finlayson Sep 17
As announced in , here's my new book with Oxford University Press, out next February. A first-hand account of our discoveries of Neanderthal behavioural capacities, written from personal experience - what you won't find out from reading papers or second-hand accounts!
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Calpe Conference Sep 17
A big thanks to all of our speakers. We are slowly changing the paradigm!! See you all again soon in Photo:
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WisconsinScienceFest Sep 17
Join at the Middleton Performing Arts Center Oct. 11 as , paleoanthropologist and professor, discusses the and identification of .
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Dr. Jill Pruetz Sep 16
Replying to @Qafzeh @LantingFrans
.Fascinating! Though we had an old chimp at that only had 2 teeth left (both mandibular), was hard of hearing and near-sighted. Special care was taken to avoid him in tussles & he processed some foods differently. Pic of 'Ross' by
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Paige Madison Sep 16
'Not in the Gorilla stage: the man of 500,000 years ago,' by Amedee Forestier from 1911, based on the Neanderthal fossils from La Chapelle.
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Michael Petraglia Sep 16
Our field season has come to an end. Some great new findings to be reported soon!
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Kate Wong Sep 16
Field trip to the archaeological site of Vale Boi in the Algarve, led by . Site contains remains of human activity dating back as far as 32,000 years ago. Among the artifacts are a 25,000-yr-old plaquette engraved with aurochs & a stone tool embedded in a red deer bone
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