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John Cutler
here's a little thread on roadmaps and roadmapping 1/8 Roadmaps are almost *never* enough as standalone artifacts. There is no possible way one "thing" can communicate so much nuance: assumptions, risk, vision, "the bet", nesting, etc.
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John Cutler Dec 3
Replying to @johncutlefish
2/8 The need for a "solid roadmap that everyone understands" (without additional conversation/context) is a race to the bottom on some level. You'll succeed, but almost by definition everyone will be missing *something*.
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John Cutler Dec 3
Replying to @johncutlefish
3/8 PMs know this...go low level, people will ask you to go high. Go high, they say get more specific. Get solution based, people will ask for "the problem". The problem... "we need specificity". It is a never ending cycle.
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John Cutler Dec 3
Replying to @johncutlefish
4/8 Feature-based roadmaps are often used because "everyone in the organization needs to know what's coming!" Fair point. But what if I told you that this need causes premature convergence which impacts outcomes? The trick is to converge at the last responsible moment.
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John Cutler Dec 3
Replying to @johncutlefish
5/8 I always tell the story about the salesperson who said "I used to want to sell the roadmap. But now I sell what we've done in the last 12 months, and the outcomes we create". Food for thought...
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John Cutler Dec 3
Replying to @johncutlefish
6/8 So... I always ask teams, "do you present the roadmap regularly, field questions, share supplemental material?" Do you revise the format based on feedback in those meetings? And do you do this up/down the org?
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John Cutler Dec 3
Replying to @johncutlefish
7/8. I also urge PMs to keep a rolling 6-12 month RM in place at all times, with progressive decomposition (big lofty one-liners are OK for anything 2+ months out). Why? Repeat conversations....no "i'm pulling together the 2019 roadmap as we speak".
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John Cutler Dec 3
Replying to @johncutlefish
8/8. In short, roadmaps rarely stand alone. Teams use them to communicate and get feedback. And then revise. You almost always need multiple versions to accommodate different audiences. There's no magic format.
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Stephen Dec 3
Replying to @johncutlefish
I love Slack’ s open for everyone Trello board:
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Charles Lambdin Dec 3
Replying to @johncutlefish
Love "roadmap is a race to the bottom." Orgs need to realize if they're trying to transform from the old top-down planning approach to an experimental approach, scaling feature-based roadmaps isn't how to do it.
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Bartek Nowak Dec 3
Replying to @johncutlefish
Thank you for this thread .
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Mike Rolfe Dec 3
Replying to @johncutlefish
"There's no magic format" totally agree with - however do you have any examples of the types of roadmaps that you have seen be successful in the past? With sanitized details of course. Would be interesting to see examples.
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Tom Hicks Dec 3
Replying to @johncutlefish
I want to have any of your tweets with PM/roadmap in them piped directly and loudly onto our office Telescreen
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John Cutler Dec 3
Replying to @mrrolfe
This is where I've gotten into trouble in the past :) Did you see this?
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Mike Rolfe Dec 3
Replying to @johncutlefish
Understandable. Enjoy the theory behind your posts and always wonder if there is some way of mixing in "real" examples that are made up but common enough implementations that many people can relate to. Or bringing in others to share their stories along with your frameworks?
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Travis Frye Dec 3
Replying to @johncutlefish
👏
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Petter Weiderholm Dec 3
Replying to @johncutlefish
Nice thread. I really like the Last Responsible Moment. For Roadmaps like to use things like 3-month specific, 6-month clarity, 12-18 month direction (replace the numbers & change the ”month” to whatever suits the company, eg sprints or minutes, ...) And revise often
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Bruce McTague Dec 3
Replying to @johncutlefish
not exactly product management, but have you read Jason Fox "How to Lead a Quest." seems like you would not only like it but pick out a couple things to compliment what you already say & think.
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Daniel Bilar Dec 3
Kindly unroll
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