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Joe Sheehan
That's about $1.6 billion in total. The players would be getting paid about $2.2 billion for half a season. There are other costs, especially with a huge testing program thrown on top, but local TV is $2.1B and nat'l is $1.7B (per ). Half is $1.9B. This is fiction.
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Joe Sheehan May 16
Replying to @joe_sheehan
Keep in mind that MLB won't actually lose half the national-TV money. The value in that deal is the postseason, plus MLB is building out the postseason to bring in more money. TV money should, in the end, just about equal payroll.
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Joe Sheehan May 16
Then you're on the side of the billionaires. Congrats.
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Ivan Corriher May 16
Replying to @joe_sheehan
And if there’s full playoffs (or even expanded) there’s no way they’re losing half the national $
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Joe Sheehan May 16
Replying to @IWCorriher
Let me get there!
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llungboy May 17
Time to “test” elimination of blackout rules for . Cord cutters who all surely would have attended games in person will be locked of viewing their local teams.
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AmericanParadox May 16
Maybe - two schools of thought. 1. Companies are trimming advertising budgets to make up for revenue losses during downturn OR 2. Baseball will do such crazy ratings bc of the virus and no other sports that companies will have to spend on MLB
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Eric Macre May 17
Do you know if you're using real numbers or not? For example are you cutting tv money in half for a half season and or are you dismissing all the costs of running the league besides player salary and testing?
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