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Joshua G. Schraiber
Evolution, statistics, software, slacktivism
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Joshua G. Schraiber 1h
In fact, I think you can make a good argument that banning child labor made a lot of poor families worse off, because now they had a child and no income from that child.
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Joshua G. Schraiber 1h
I don't think unpaid undergraduate work is as bad as children risking life and limb in a factory, but I don't think it's as crazy a comparison as y'all seem to think.
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Joshua G. Schraiber 1h
I think that a lot of child labor was voluntary in the same sense that undergraduate research is: there was a pressing economic motivation (e.g. your family *needed* the money) and you weren't entirely in control of your own destiny, so you did it.
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Joshua G. Schraiber 2h
Curious: do you think that blanket banning of (paid!) child labor without an assessment of the impacts was a good idea or a bad idea? Should we have done a randomized controlled trial?
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Joshua G. Schraiber retweeted
Michael Hoffman 2h
I respect social science research but don't agree that a lack of evidence means a status quo that was also adopted without evidence should be kept.
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Joshua G. Schraiber 4h
Absolutely agree with this
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Joshua G. Schraiber 4h
Replying to @razibkhan
Yeah, definitely thinking of R1 faculty in this context, very different at e.g. small liberal arts college, where I think your analysis may be closer than mine.
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Joshua G. Schraiber 4h
Not a huge fan of this argument because it has lead to the current rash of unpaid internships across disciplines. There's a reason that there's a movement among artists to never take work that is just "for exposure".
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Joshua G. Schraiber 4h
Replying to @razibkhan
I guess I think we're more like shop keepers than doctors, especially in terms of class dynamics.
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Joshua G. Schraiber 4h
Replying to @razibkhan
The thing I think makes us more petty bourgeoisie than that is that we directly hire employees who work for only us on tasks that we assign them. When they're done here, they work directly for someone else, or start their own small business, as it were.
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Joshua G. Schraiber retweeted
Brandon M. Lind 4h
And who’s to say that ‘rich’ kids aren’t getting the paid positions anyway? If we invoke ‘systemic’ problems, the answer isn’t if/if not we pay undergrads - that’s only part of the solution. If we care so deeply, what (else) are we doing to fix it?
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Joshua G. Schraiber 4h
Replying to @razibkhan
I think you're right in that we occupy a weird space with respect to the means of production and labor value, probably one that didn't really exist in such a formal way until recently.
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Joshua G. Schraiber 4h
I don't know the easy solution, and I don't think there's a one-size-fits-all answer, because the issue is systemic. But I think (as was pointed out before) one option is to lobby the administration to allow students to work for course credit, which is at least something...
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Joshua G. Schraiber 4h
Replying to @razibkhan
I'm pretty sure I came to this realization myself, don't think I've heard anyone else say it in this way. But it seems clear to me that we fit: we don't own the means of production ourselves, but we do rent the labor of others, alongside whom we often work.
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Joshua G. Schraiber 4h
Maybe I'm missing something, but if she's getting paid hourly, why is that any impediment to her going awol? I did it as an hourly paid undergrad and I'm happy for my paid undergrad to do it right now?
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Joshua G. Schraiber 4h
The history of labor movements says that strikes and sabotage work
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Joshua G. Schraiber 4h
We can collectively use our labor power (and as faculty our power as petty bourgeoisie) to create the conditions that force an injection of scientific funding by refusing to do unpaid and underpaid work ourselves and refusing to tolerate it when it happens to others
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Joshua G. Schraiber retweeted
Grace Mosley 5h
Replying to @jgschraiber
Ideally, institutions would ban uncompensated (pay or credit) research positions...but I think the individual grad student does have some power. They can explain to their PI/labmates why they find it problematic, & hopefully change at least lab policy
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Joshua G. Schraiber retweeted
Kevin Bird 5h
Replying to @jgschraiber
If all works well the grad student gets mentoring experience, the ugrad gets funding, and the PI gets labor without cutting into core budget. Largely depends on how well a university gives funding to students though
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Joshua G. Schraiber 5h
Replying to @itsbirdemic
This is a kind of interesting and pragmatic compromise
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