Twitter | Search | |
Jani Eväkallio
So many great talks at today. Haven't been to a conf as an audience member for a while, and it's given me time to think about the art of public speaking. A thread. 👇
Reply Retweet Like More
Jani Eväkallio Apr 13
Replying to @jevakallio
Everyone has great content and interesting things to say. But sometimes we can subconsciously undermine our effect by falling into easy traps. Here are some speaker "don'ts" to be mindful to avoid. None of these are subtweeting a particular talk.
Reply Retweet Like
Jani Eväkallio Apr 13
Replying to @jevakallio
1. Don't decredentialise yourself. Don't say what you don't know or what you haven't done. Tell us why you're the expert and why we should hang on your every word. You are the show everyone came to see.
Reply Retweet Like
Jani Eväkallio Apr 13
Replying to @jevakallio
2. Don't flatten expectations. Don't start by telling us what we won't be covering in this talk. Give us an outline of what is to come, and (if you must) discuss further possible exploration at the end.
Reply Retweet Like
Jani Eväkallio Apr 13
Replying to @jevakallio
3. Don't undermine your premise If you start with a strong statement or idea, don't argue against yourself. You may feel this protects you from criticism but really you're just being your own worst critic. Leave it to the Q&A
Reply Retweet Like
Jani Eväkallio Apr 13
Replying to @jevakallio
4. Don't underestimate the audience. This is not a school paper. You don't need to start with the dictionary definition. Speak to the top of your intelligence and assume the same from your listeners. If something fell through, they can ask you later.
Reply Retweet Like
Jani Eväkallio Apr 13
Replying to @jevakallio
5. Don't forget about the audience. Talks about technology are ok. Talks about the presenter's point of view are good. Best talks, though, are about the audience. Ask yourself what you want to communicate, and make it relatable to problems they may have.
Reply Retweet Like
Jani Eväkallio Apr 13
Replying to @jevakallio
6. Don't forget to tie high-concept ideas to practical examples The idea might be crystal clear in your head, and it's your job to transfer that to the audience's heads. If you talk about high concepts without grounding it to examples, you risk losing the audience.
Reply Retweet Like
Jani Eväkallio Apr 13
Replying to @jevakallio
7. Don't get meta The talk is about the topic. Don't talk about the talk itself, where else you gave it, or what it could have been. Nobody knows what it was supposed to look like. Don't expose the machinery behind the magic.
Reply Retweet Like
Cristiano Rastelli Apr 13
Replying to @jevakallio
Yes, but also don't overestimate: there are a lot of learners and newcomers and juniors and sometimes students (today I've learnt that in React 16.3 the custom attributes are not stripped anymore, for example; probably super obvious for a lot of people here ¯\_(ツ)_/¯)
Reply Retweet Like
Jani Eväkallio Apr 13
Replying to @jevakallio
8. Don't forget to build a narrative 30 minutes is a long time. In order to keep your audience engaged, weave a narrative and stick to it. Laundry lists are rough on stage. Make sure you end with a conclusion.
Reply Retweet Like
sid @ 🇦🇷 Apr 13
Replying to @areaweb @jevakallio
Reply Retweet Like
Jani Eväkallio Apr 13
Replying to @jevakallio
9. Don't forget the visuals It's a conference. You put a lot of effort to your presentation. Make it show. If you don't have the design skills, ask a friend or use a template. Your content deserves a pretty dressing.
Reply Retweet Like
André Staltz Apr 13
Replying to @jevakallio
10. Use horse analogies
Reply Retweet Like
Jani Eväkallio Apr 13
Replying to @jevakallio
10. Most importantly, don't be this guy.
Reply Retweet Like
The General Apr 13
Is your list battle tested?
Reply Retweet Like
𝙅𝙤𝙚𝙡 𝙂𝙪𝙚𝙧𝙧𝙖 🐍 Apr 13
Replying to @jevakallio
Reply Retweet Like
Tomasz Łakomy Apr 13
Replying to @jevakallio
But I wanna
Reply Retweet Like
shawn swyx wang 🇸🇬 Apr 13
Replying to @jevakallio
duckface game strong!
Reply Retweet Like
Ayush Rawal Apr 13
This along with 's medium post is some of the most useful advice for giving talks.
Reply Retweet Like