Twitter | Search | |
Jamison Dance
family and eng management and and ex- and and 🏋 and 🏂 and computing and business and the Dunning-Krueger effect
18,281
Tweets
589
Following
7,161
Followers
Tweets
Jamison Dance retweeted
John Cutler 5h
You can have... goals w/o w/o w/o w/o scale w/o assumptions w/o a canvas an experiment w/o Figure out why X works in context.
Reply Retweet Like
Jamison Dance 10h
Writing correct C is hard. A consequence isn’t that we don’t write software in C, but that we don’t write *secure* software in C.
Reply Retweet Like
Jamison Dance 17h
What is so nice about the way OCaml does modules? I've seen people talk about first-class modules but I don't understand why this is a neat thing.
Reply Retweet Like
Jamison Dance 18h
Replying to @vhlongon @shylohb and 2 others
Hey, email team@reactrally.com for help with this!
Reply Retweet Like
Jamison Dance 21h
"His social disruptive commerce philosophy (strategy for perceived value) and disdain for query-based marketing origination has allowed him to 100x his nearest competitors." welp, that's enough linkedin for today
Reply Retweet Like
Jamison Dance Jun 18
This talk by on text effects with pure CSS is wonderful.
Reply Retweet Like
Jamison Dance retweeted
Domesticated Monstergirl Apr 11
how did "the quick brown fox jumped over the lazy dog" become the typical sentence that contains all letters of the alphabet and not "sphinx of black quartz, judge my vow" which is objectively a million times cooler
Reply Retweet Like
Jamison Dance Jun 17
Replying to @Mandy_Kerr
I’d be happy to review!
Reply Retweet Like
Jamison Dance Jun 17
Yeah I guess I should make it clear I’m talking about type systems that are nicer than Java, usually found in ML languages.
Reply Retweet Like
Jamison Dance Jun 17
Replying to @alesroubicek
I haven’t used good automated refactoring tools in dynamic languages. Do you have examples of this kind of tooling you could point me to?
Reply Retweet Like
Jamison Dance Jun 16
Gradual typing is cool but has plenty of downsides. When there is an easy escape hatch it’s tempting to use, which means you end up with big holes, usually in the tricky parts of your codebase.
Reply Retweet Like
Jamison Dance Jun 16
Replying to @cirsca @ryanflorence
Dunno about more time consuming but I definitely find it more pleasant. I still write tests in typed code, just fewer tests that are "make sure this function doesn't do something really dumb."
Reply Retweet Like
Jamison Dance Jun 16
Replying to @ryanflorence @reasonml
Also a million billion people will recommend TypeScript. It’s nice since you’re just learning the type system, not a whole language, but I’d look at if you want a typed browser lang to expand your brain.
Reply Retweet Like
Jamison Dance Jun 16
Replying to @ryanflorence
The tradeoffs include more up-front thinking about data types and some effort that feels like just making the type system happy or figuring out how to let it do something you could just crank out in a dynamic lang. Some people hate those tradeoffs, some don’t.
Reply Retweet Like
Jamison Dance Jun 16
Replying to @ryanflorence @sarahmei
In my experience a linter is nice but a good static type system is so much more helpful that it’s a pretty different experience. There are lots of problems a linter can’t catch that types can.
Reply Retweet Like
Jamison Dance Jun 16
Replying to @sarahmei
Also type systems that include effects (Haskell, Elm, etc) make my brain happy in ways I can’t articulate yet. I wrote lots of pure functions in JS but there is something nice about *knowing* via a compiler that a function can’t have side effects.
Reply Retweet Like
Jamison Dance Jun 16
Replying to @sarahmei
Basically I’m not smart enough to write tests that prove correctness and also don’t result in a ton of wasted effort while refactoring, good static type systems let me sidestep that dilemma.
Reply Retweet Like
Jamison Dance Jun 16
Replying to @sarahmei
In dynamic langs refactoring is either terrifying or enabled by lots of conscious investment in testing. In static langs, effortless refactoring is a consequence of having a working program, not a result of careful forethought and wise testing.
Reply Retweet Like
Jamison Dance Jun 15
My team at is participating in a paid internship program for women returning to work after taking time off to have kids. See or DM me for more info!
Reply Retweet Like
Jamison Dance Jun 15
FWIW my impression of this career path is similar: often promised, hard to follow through (though it does happen sometimes!)
Reply Retweet Like