Twitter | Search | |
Seumas MacDhòmhnaill
δοῦλος τοῦ Χριστοῦ. Patristics, Classics, Greek, Latin, Gàidhlig. Language acquisition, digital humanities. PhD. Academic Ronin.
5,699
Tweets
442
Following
739
Followers
Tweets
Seumas MacDhòmhnaill 11h
Replying to @Alexander_Ver
non bene scio, fortasse 63 plus minusve.
Reply Retweet Like
Seumas MacDhòmhnaill 18h
sicut semper, mihi paene invito dormiendum est.
Reply Retweet Like
Seumas MacDhòmhnaill 19h
Replying to @Rodericus
There are some interesting, and erudite, Latinists, hiding in all sorts of corners of the web.
Reply Retweet Like
Seumas MacDhòmhnaill 19h
Replying to @Rodericus
Are the people still on IRC the same ones still using usenet?
Reply Retweet Like
Seumas MacDhòmhnaill 19h
Discord is pretty much late 90s IRC rebooted with voice chat, right?
Reply Retweet Like
Seumas MacDhòmhnaill 21h
nuper acromati tui in quo "non tertiam rem publicam litterarum dicam, potius rem publicam nugatorum latinorum" dixisti, et maxime risum movit.
Reply Retweet Like
Seumas MacDhòmhnaill retweeted
Mike Aubrey - Koine-Greek.com Oct 20
Replying to @jeltzz
I'd just be happy if everyone could simply use a phonology that was (in some approximation) actually used by Greeks at some point in history. Modern? Great! Vox Greaeca? Great! Buth? Great! Gignac/Threatte/Smith/Teodorsson/etc.? Great! Bubenik? Awesome.
Reply Retweet Like
Seumas MacDhòmhnaill 21h
I *may* have bookmarked a list of Australia's deadliest wildlife for a podcast....
Reply Retweet Like
Seumas MacDhòmhnaill 22h
Replying to @jeltzz
and yet, many well-meaning people (and less well meaning) insist on learners getting perfect phonology before learning anything. this is backwards, and harmful. get on with acquisition, *perfect* phonology can wait.
Reply Retweet Like
Seumas MacDhòmhnaill 22h
my second pronunciation gripe of the day, and the last for awhile - As best I know the research, phonology is one area that L2 speakers *often* take the longest to approach native-like standards. but this rarely has anything to do with their linguistic competence.
Reply Retweet Like
Seumas MacDhòmhnaill 22h
Replying to @Alexander_Ver
English, a great example of never letting pronunciation and orthography have anything to do with each other!
Reply Retweet Like
Seumas MacDhòmhnaill Oct 20
Replying to @pigpuddle
Today, only a handful of people know what it means... Soon you will know.
Reply Retweet Like
Seumas MacDhòmhnaill Oct 20
Replying to @jeltzz
also have a ton of respect for those 15th cent 'Latins' who laboured so hard to learn Greek with such difficulty.
Reply Retweet Like
Seumas MacDhòmhnaill Oct 20
Finished reading Botley's book this evening. Feel like it has opened up a door and now I must go through it. aka, more reading about Renaissance Greek learning....
Reply Retweet Like
Seumas MacDhòmhnaill Oct 20
Replying to @Fergus_Walsh
There is no winning, but we could at least avoid stupid ways of losing. so to speak.
Reply Retweet Like
Seumas MacDhòmhnaill Oct 20
okay, I hate pronunciation wars. But you can't actually argue that erasmian or restored classical are *necessary* because otherwise we can't distinguish vowels. Because, um, hundreds of years of speakers using ioticised pronunciations.
Reply Retweet Like
Seumas MacDhòmhnaill Oct 20
I like when I'm off twitter long enough that catching up is impossible. sorry if I missed your brilliant tweets
Reply Retweet Like
Seumas MacDhòmhnaill Oct 20
Replying to @Ben_Rae
intonation, fronting, phrase and clause structure, use of other english-appropriate discourse markers. There's no 'translating' μὲν... δέ in abstract, only in context.
Reply Retweet Like
Seumas MacDhòmhnaill Oct 19
Things I couldn't care less about: Pronunciation minutiae
Reply Retweet Like
Seumas MacDhòmhnaill Oct 18
I'm amazed at the confidence of undergraduates at telling me what definitely does not occur across all Greek literature
Reply Retweet Like