Twitter | Search | |
Jay Nordlinger
Senior editor, National Review; music critic, The New Criterion
24,708
Tweets
1,017
Following
29,366
Followers
Tweets
Jay Nordlinger 15h
Reply Retweet Like
Jay Nordlinger 15h
What I (personally) wanted out of the Mueller report was one thing: the answer to the question, What went on with the Russians in the 2016 election? I also had this hope for the report: that it be clear, leaving no ambiguity. Mission accomplished on both fronts? (Sounds like it.)
Reply Retweet Like
Jay Nordlinger 16h
There are those who believe that Trump is fit for office, in mind and character, and those who do not. That has always been the case. It has never changed. And I guess never will. To a degree, the Mueller report is like a Rorschach test.
Reply Retweet Like
Jay Nordlinger 19h
Exoneration, I guess, is in the eye of the beholder. A topsy-turvy, and foggy, and treacherous, world.
Reply Retweet Like
Jay Nordlinger 19h
If you paid your taxes in a lump sum on April 15, what would you think? If, in reading the Mueller report, you were reading about Trump, Russia, etc., for the first time, what would you think? "Old news" lessens the shock. So it was with the Clinton scandals (all of them).
Reply Retweet Like
Jay Nordlinger 19h
I must say, the Mueller report does not seem to me the product of a Dirty Cop and his criminal crew. And to you?
Reply Retweet Like
Jay Nordlinger 20h
Much of what is in the Mueller report, we already knew from the lying Fake News (just FYI and BTW). (And FWIW.)
Reply Retweet Like
Jay Nordlinger 20h
Solzhenitsyn spoke of "obedience to lies and daily participation in lies." What was liberating to the human self, he said, was "personal non-participation in lies." There have been people in the Trump administration who have refused to participate. That is a piece of consolation.
Reply Retweet Like
Jay Nordlinger 20h
The president repeatedly lied and encouraged others to lie, or demanded that they lie. I find this depressing. Worse, though, is that a great many people simply don't care.
Reply Retweet Like
Jay Nordlinger 20h
I remember reading, years ago, that when Nixon was at his most unhinged, his aides simply ignored his orders. I thought that was extraordinary and problematic. I still do.
Reply Retweet Like
Jay Nordlinger 20h
In June 2017, I wrote, "After the president fired Comey as FBI director, the president's spokeswoman, Sarah Sanders, said, 'I've heard from countless members of the FBI who are grateful for the president’s decision.' I'm not sure I believe that." Honestly, who could have?
Reply Retweet Like
Jay Nordlinger 21h
Reply Retweet Like
Jay Nordlinger 23h
It seems to me that many of our debates over the last several years have been nothingburger vs. somethingburger. People switch sides depending on their tribe. If the burger seems dangerous to your tribe — it’s a nothing. If it bodes ill for the other tribe — it’s a something. 🤣
Reply Retweet Like
Jay Nordlinger 23h
He thinks that, if he says it often enough, or shouts it often enough, you’ll believe it. Sadly, he’s probably right. The presidency has a hell of a megaphone — to use for good or ill.
Reply Retweet Like
Jay Nordlinger Apr 18
Reply Retweet Like
Jay Nordlinger Apr 18
Reply Retweet Like
Jay Nordlinger Apr 18
Between the Kremlin and Hungary, ever closer union? A huge issue.
Reply Retweet Like
Jay Nordlinger Apr 18
The European Right has a choice to make: Putin or democracy? I wish I could bet on the latter ...
Reply Retweet Like
Jay Nordlinger Apr 18
The trashing of has always sickened me. A great and noble beast, set upon by gnats. Good for you, AGM.
Reply Retweet Like
Jay Nordlinger Apr 17
For the music-minded, a review of Simone Young and the New York Philharmonic in the Mahler Sixth. Some interesting issues arise.
Reply Retweet Like